contact meet jeff watch video webstore books motivation blog top 10 lists speaking

12 Personal Branding Essentials for Salespeople and Marketers

By Jeff Beals

In order to be an effective salesperson or savvy marketer, you must understand the value of personal branding and how to make it a part of your work.  When it comes to personal branding, keep these 12 key points in mind:

  1. Regardless of what you sell, everything is easier when you have a great personal brand.
  2. If you have a widely recognized and highly respected personal brand, your voicemails and emails are more likely to be returned.
  3. All sales professionals should seek to become celebrities in their own spheres of interest.
  4. Excellence is not enough. In a competitive marketplace, talent and hard work are simply expected.
  5. You are not just a human being. You are an entity, a business of one, a business unto yourself.
  6. You are in a lifelong series of “campaigns” trying to be “elected” to whatever matters to you. That’s why you should think like a politician.
  7. Live actively and focus externally. In order to become a celebrity in your sphere of interest, you need to be seemingly “everywhere.”
  8. Develop an area of self-marketing expertise, something related to what you do but is fascinating to people who do not do what you do. This is what you talk about when you network.
  9. Don’t network just for the sake of networking. Focus on results.
  10. Put on a show. Don’t be someone you are not, but play up your strengths and put forth your best image possible.
  11. While you are portraying yourself in a positive light, do keep it real. Your prospects can sense authenticity as well as a lack of it.
  12. Never go back on any promise made to any prospective client during a networking encounter.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

Click here to subscribe to Jeff’s weekly articles!http://bit.ly/1l86RC6 

Click here to see sample videos of Jeff speaking to live audiences!  http://bit.ly/1gZqcoA  

You are welcome to forward this article (with author citation) to anyone else who might benefit from it.     

The Cell Phone Faux Pas

By Jeff Beals

Today’s professionals can stand out among their peers by simply using good communications etiquette.

Little things practiced consistently over time can make a big difference.

Cell phones are a perfect example.  They have revolutionized productivity, but with that revolution has come one of the biggest mistakes a professional can make – rudely interrupting a face-to-face business meeting to take another call.

You may think that taking calls at any time makes you more efficient. This is a fallacy. Every time you take a call during a meeting, you have to pause, offering an insincere apology for your intention to take a call. Then you speak on the phone. Because there is someone sitting across the table staring at you, you will probably not be at total liberty to say all that you would if the conversation was more private, which means you’ll be calling the person a second time after the meeting.

When you finally hang up, you then take time to apologize for the interruption. Then it takes time to catch back up to where you were in your first conversation. Meanwhile, the momentum and flow of your meeting has been compromised. This is inefficient and ends up costing you more time in the long run.

Even worse, answering a cell phone is incredibly inconsiderate of the other person. Everyone is busy – not just you. For every minute that your meeting counterpart has to sit staring at you conversing with someone you perceive to be more important, he or she becomes restless, irritated and resentful of you.

If you truly want to make an impression with colleagues and clients, make a commitment to communicating properly and politely. Your reputation depends on it.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

Click here to subscribe to Jeff’s weekly articles!http://bit.ly/1l86RC6 

Click here to see sample videos of Jeff speaking to live audiences!  http://bit.ly/1gZqcoA  

You are welcome to forward this article (with author citation) to anyone else who might benefit from it.     

Stay Front-and-Center because They Forget You Fast

By Jeff Beals

Many of you know that I serve as executive VP of a regional commercial  real estate company in addition to my work as a speaker and business author.  I’ve been working in real estate for more than 13 years.  Our family of companies does quite well.  We have nearly 400 employees and oversee properties in six states.

A few years ago, a company owned by one of my extended family members purchased a large industrial building.  It was a substantial transaction.  I learned about the deal by reading about it in my local business newspaper, which obviously meant that my real estate firm and I were not involved.

At first, I was miffed that this person didn’t engage our company’s brokerage services, but I knew I had no right to be mad.  I never asked for his business.  After all, it is the sales person’s job to get the business; not the would-be client’s job to give it to you.

As luck had it, I ran into the relative not long after the deal closed.  I congratulated him on the purchase and then encouraged him to call me if his firm ever contemplated additional real estate deals down the road.

Would you like to know what he said to me?

“Oh, geez, I forgot you were in real estate!  I should have called you.”

Wow.

That response hit me like a ton of bricks.   I obviously missed out on a nice payday.  In my self-absorbed world, I assumed everyone knew I worked in real estate.  Those words opened my eyes and allowed me to see the world through someone else’s eyes.  Just because I lived and breathed real estate didn’t mean anyone else did.

The family member was focused on his business and his financial goals.  Remembering that some distant relative worked for a real estate company was certainly not on his front burner.

What’s the moral of this story?

That’s easy…Stay in front of people!

Find ways to keep your personal brand and your company’s products/services top of mind.  You never know when somebody will be ready to buy what you sell.  But when they are ready, you want your name and your face to immediately pop into their heads.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

Click here to subscribe to Jeff’s weekly articles!http://bit.ly/1l86RC6 

Click here to see sample videos of Jeff speaking to live audiences!  http://bit.ly/1gZqcoA  

You are welcome to forward this article (with author citation) to anyone else who might benefit from it.     

Aside from Being the Right Thing to Do, It’s in Your Own Best Interest

By Jeff Beals

Back in the 19th Century, the Scottish philosopher Thomas Carlyle told us, “A great man shows his greatness by the way he treats little men.”

Aside from simply being the right thing to do, following Carlyle’s advice serves your best interest.

To get ahead in business and in life, you certainly must build relationships with the “right” people, but you have to be careful. If you become too obsessed with impressing the rich and powerful, you might miss out on the many other people who have wonderful things to offer you. After all, those who are tiny in their professions today can grow to become monsters in the future.

So, as Carlyle recommended, if you want be truly great, start by taking time for all the people around you even those who seemingly can do nothing for you.

The seemingly non-powerful people in your life may have significant influence over powerful decision makers.

Keep in mind that clients can come from anywhere and anyone. The relationships you currently take for granted could become very valuable.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

Click here to subscribe to Jeff’s weekly articles!http://bit.ly/1l86RC6 

Click here to see sample videos of Jeff speaking to live audiences!  http://bit.ly/1gZqcoA  

You are welcome to forward this article (with author citation) to anyone else who might benefit from it.     

Communication Must Prove It’s All About Them and Not About You

By Jeff Beals

I plan to buy a new car in the next few weeks, so I have been stopping by several dealerships to ask questions and take test drives.  It’s been fun to observe the sales techniques (or lack thereof) employed by the various dealerships and the individual salespeople.

I met a friendly salesperson at the first dealership I visited.  I spent about an hour with her.  She asked me a few questions and we took a test drive.  A couple days later, I received the following email (some information has been deliberately omitted to protect the guilty):

Hi Jeffery,

I want to take this opportunity to sincerely thank you for your time you’ve spent with me discussing your transportation needs.  The most important thing for me is to make certain that you are completely satisfied with our selection of vehicles and you received the attention and service you deserve.

If you have any questions or would like additional information before making a decision, do not hesitate to call me at (###) ###-####.  And thanks again for giving us an opportunity to earn your business.

Thanks again,

[NAME], Sales Associate

So what’s wrong with the above message?  Many things!

First of all, my name is “Jeffrey” not “Jeffery.”  That’s minor, but little things sometimes destroy deals.  Dale Carnegie once said that a person’s first name is the sweet word in the English language to that person.  When it comes to client names, don’t mess them up.

Second, the note is too much about her, the salesperson, instead of being focused on me, the prospective customer.  What’s more, it’s as generic as can be.  The car I drove was expensive, not the most expensive car in the world, but costly enough that I probably merited a personalized note.

Third, and most importantly, this is a blown opportunity.  Where is the focus on what I the customer truly value?!!?  If you want to sell something, you must uncover what the prospect truly values and then demonstrate just how your product or service meets that value.  There’s none of that here, and just so you know, I laid it all out for her on a silver platter…

When we talked at the dealership, I told the salesperson that I didn’t necessarily like big vehicles but I needed one because I have young kids who participate in activities and go places with friends, thus necessitating a large vehicle.  Furthermore, my wife’s parents from out-of-state visit us frequently, so I need a large vehicle that can transport all of us when the in-laws are in town.  Despite this need for a big vehicle, I don’t like vehicles that “look big.”  I want something stylish so as to deemphasize the vehicle’s size.

Given all of that, perhaps this would have been a better email:

Hi Jeffrey,

I want to take this opportunity to sincerely thank you for the time you’ve spent with me discussing your transportation needs. 

Having safe, reliable transportation for your family is of the utmost importance.  The [MODEL NAME] provides the best of both worlds for you.  It’s big enough to comfortably seat the kids and the grandparents when they’re in town.  At the same time, it offers the style and all the extra features you want from a high-performance car.

You mentioned that you liked black as your exterior color.  Good news!  We have a black one with the [NAME OF UPGRADE PACKAGE] you like. Perhaps you could come back in and test-drive that actual car.

If you have any questions or would like additional information before making a decision, do not hesitate to call me at (###) ###-####. Thanks again for giving me the opportunity to earn your business.  I look forward to working with you.

Thanks again,

[NAME], Sales Associate

Well, a couple weeks went by, and I never received a personalized email or even a phone call for the sales rep, but I did receive this:

Hi Jeffery,

I noticed we have been out of a contact for awhile.  I wanted to make certain I have provided all the information you required to make an informed decision. 

Our inventory has changed since we last spoke, and I realize your needs may have changed as well.  If you have purchased a vehicle elsewhere just drop me a note and I will update my records.  If you have any questions, please let me know.
My commitment is to earn your business.

Thank you,

[NAME], Sales Associate

Good grief!  It’s like she’s already given up.  Even worse, the message is still focused on her agenda and not the customer’s.  Let’s face it – most of today’s overworked professionals are so busy they’re barely keeping their heads above water.  Very few people would take the time to pick up the phone and call her simply so she can “update her records.”

Please know that this salesperson was very nice and friendly when I met her in person.  She did a fairly good job of questioning me and qualifying me.  She had the product-knowledge part of her job down pat.  But she’s missing out on a great deal of potential opportunity by not zeroing in with razor-sharp focus on exactly what her prospective customers truly care about.

Without focusing on what I value and catering the message as to alleviate my pain-points, the salesperson’s email communications are nothing more than a waste of her time.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

Click here to subscribe to Jeff’s weekly articles!http://bit.ly/1l86RC6

Click here to see sample videos of Jeff speaking to live audiences!  http://bit.ly/1gZqcoA 

You are welcome to forward this article (with author citation) to anyone else who might benefit from it.      

Entrepreneurship Rising Among the Flooded Pot-Canyons

By Jeff Beals

(BAVARO, Dominican Republic) – If you never thought a dirt road could be at the same time dusty and soggy you’ve apparently never been on this one.

It’s day four of our family vacation and we’re on the “Polaris Extreme Buggy Adventure” in which we drive all-terrain sports vehicles through the jungle-like countryside on the Island of Hispaniola’s northeastern corner.

NOTE: I have a habit of finding learning opportunities while on vacation.  My long-time readers might remember this article, “Sales Secrets from Baja California” published in February of 2012… http://bit.ly/1mWdIkD

The dirt road, littered with rocks as big as eight inches in diameter, is pocked with more than mere potholes.  These obstacles are more aptly described as “pot-canyons” or “pot-valleys.”  The level parts of the road kick up incredible dust.  The pot-canyons are flooded with yellowish water from yesterday’s rains.  We are filthy, covered in muck from head to toe.  No one seems to mind the dirtiness, however, because we’re having a good time.

We drive past tiny farms and through one impoverished village after another, each full of curious children who run out to wave at us and untethered livestock that occasionally step in front of us.

Eventually we make our first stop, a farm where workers produce coffee and cigars by hand.  It’s one of several “souvenir opportunities” scheduled on this excursion.

As we dismount our off-road vehicles, villagers greet us peddling a wide variety of goods and services – coffee, alcohol, hand-rolled smokes, jewelry, art and the opportunity to have your photo taken with a green lizard sitting on your shoulder.  We buy a couple things, but not too much – same goes for the rest of the 30 or 40 people in our caravan.

But one village boy about 10 or 11 years old offered something unique for sale.

As we were preparing to start driving again, the boy approached one of the persons in our group.  He picked up her helmet and tenderly placed it on her head before buckling the chin strap.  He then fixed her bandana (we all wore them over our noses and mouths to keep out the dust while driving).  Finally, he took her sun glasses and wiped them clean using his shirt.  He then proceeded to do the same thing for me and my family.  In return, he only asked for a single U.S. dollar.

He said not even a single word while diligently and gently doing his work.  It was really quite amazing.

Of course, the sales and marketing speaker in me watched him from a different angle.  I studied his every move.  I loved how he offered his services with such simplicity and authenticity.

I have long been fascinated with the simple sales and marketing techniques I sometimes see from street vendors especially outside the United States.  I always appreciate and admire the entrepreneurship that can spring forth from persons most of the world considers to be dirt poor.  I’m fascinated by them, because I think sophisticated marketers can learn a great deal from them.

Sure, it requires many more resources and a great deal of complexity to distribute millions of products to millions of consumers spread out over vast geographies.  Nevertheless, I think we can sometimes benefit by going back to the basics – service, humility, providing value and building a personal connection regardless how slight our resources or how little time we have.

This young Dominican entrepreneur provides a good reminder that no matter how stressful and no matter how complicated your work might be,  the things that truly matter are a tender touch, good service and attention to those details your customers really value.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

Click here to subscribe to Jeff’s weekly articles!http://bit.ly/1l86RC6 

Click here to see sample videos of Jeff speaking to live audiences!  http://bit.ly/1gZqcoA  

You are welcome to forward this article (with author citation) to anyone else who might benefit from it.      

As in Politics, Name Recognition Leads to Business & Life Success

By Jeff Beals

Note:  Take a deep breath…It’s political primary election season in the United States.  Even though political campaigning can be annoying, there are tremendous lessons executives, entrepreneurs, marketers, sales reps and individual professionals can learn from those crafty politicos you see on television…  

Many years ago, I volunteered on the political campaign of a local businessman, who was running for city council. During the campaign, I attended a number of political events, but one candidates’ forum stood out in my mind.

Candidates from each city council district gathered in a high school gymnasium in front of an audience comprised of community activists, neighborhood leaders, local busy-bodies and a smattering of other interested persons. Each candidate had just a couple minutes to tout his or her candidacy.

One candidate – a long-shot, political newcomer, who ended up losing in a landslide – had the most unique speech. He stood at the podium and said, “They tell me that political campaigning is all about name recognition. If that’s the case, my name is…” He proceeded to repeat his name over and over again, in a melodic/rhythmic way. He would say a couple sentences of substance, and then once again, repeat his name over and over. It was cute. People laughed. I’m not sure how seriously the audience took him, but he made an impression. I vividly remember that stump speech many years later.

While this nontraditional politician didn’t have the financial resources to win, he was right about one thing – it’s all about name recognition. At the very basic level, a politician running for office must focus first and foremost on establishing name recognition. The same thing applies to any professional working in any field. If you are going to market yourself, you must establish a recognized name among members of your personal target audience.

Political campaign strategy can teach us a great deal about our own self marketing. In establishing name recognition, politicians are good role models. Even though many of us find politics to be distasteful, we must think like politicians, because each of us is in a lifelong personal campaign.

Politicians build campaign strategies that are fundamentally based upon establishing a name. Frankly, the average voter is politically unsophisticated and poorly informed about election issues and candidates. Though I have a master’s degree in political science, I must confess that this sometimes applies to me too. Sure, I’ll be quite knowledgeable of some candidates or ballot issues, but there are always a few about whom I know nothing. When typical voters come to an obscure part of the ballot, where candidates for something like the Mosquito Abatement District are listed, chances are they know very little. In this situation, typical voters first look at the names to see if they recognize any of them. If one name sounds more familiar than the others, that is who gets the vote.

Politicians know this, and they act accordingly. That’s why most political advertising is so image oriented and not focused on complicated policy issues. That’s why you see acres and acres of yard signs littering the cityscape during each election cycle. It’s why we are inundated on radio and television with fatiguing political commercials. Pay close attention, and you’ll notice that each commercial says or shows the candidate’s name multiple times in a 30- or 60-second timeframe.

Campaign consultants know that their political clients must use a variety of media, a “media mix,” to develop name recognition. In order to plant your name firmly in each voter’s cranium, you must penetrate their personal lives. To do this, politicians come at us through television, radio, social media, direct mail, and in most local races, they literally knock on our doors. They know that frequency matters, which is why the same signs pop up everywhere and the same commercials air over and over again.

A politician doesn’t miss a parade, pancake feed, major sporting event or any fish fry on a Lenten Friday. Any gathering of potential voters becomes a politician magnate. Campaign managers work feverishly to get their candidates on the news, hopefully portrayed in a positive light. Everything is focused on getting as many positive impressions possible without the candidate saying anything of deep substance.

There’s no question: In politics, business and personal marketing, it all begins with name recognition. Like politicians, businesses repeat their names or brand names over and over again, using a carefully chosen media mix. It works. When a customer is searching on Google for a real estate company for example, she will find a list of several real estate companies. On her screen, they all look the same. Who will she call? Most likely, she will choose a company she’s heard of. To most customers, a familiar name feels like a safe choice.

In politics, voters rely on the candidate’s name identification. In business, customers rely on familiarity. Since YOU are a business unto yourself, and since you are engaged in a lifelong campaign to promote yourself, you must establish strong name recognition and personal brand awareness right now.  If you do that, you will have an easier time finding clients, getting access to whatever matters to you and playing a bigger role in your company, community and world.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

Click here to subscribe to Jeff’s weekly articles!http://bit.ly/1l86RC6 

Click here to see sample videos of Jeff speaking to live audiences!  http://bit.ly/1gZqcoA  

You are welcome to forward this article (with author citation) to anyone else who might benefit from it.       

Thoughts on Three Types of Sales Objections

By Jeff Beals

There are three main reasons for objections: one is good, one is neutral, and the third is bad.

Fortunately, the vast majority of objections, especially if they occur later in the process, are good.

Bad objections are barriers or roadblocks used by the prospect to get away from the salesperson or to stop the process. Typically, these objections are used to convey that the client is turned off by the product, scared of doing the deal or flat-out uninterested. These are reasons or arguments as to why a person does not want to work with you. When you receive this type of objection, it’s usually rather obvious. These objections are telling you that the deal has a low likelihood of happening and that you may be wasting your time to pursue this client any further.

Sometimes, an objection can sound bad but really isn’t. It’s actually neutral. A prospect might want to delay the decision until a later time for a very legitimate reason. A prospect might be interested in what you are selling but just doesn’t have the time to deal with it right now. They might give you a soft no just because they are under too much pressure to deal with you.

Any no that comes out of these situations should be taken with a grain of salt. Give the prospect some space by asking when you should meet again. Then be sure to follow up.

The lion’s share of other objections are positive. To a sales neophyte, they might look and sound bad on the surface, but they are really quite encouraging. In fact, good objections are so important to the selling process that you ought to be concerned if you don’t receive any. It may be a sign that the prospect is not as interested as you think.

Good objections are actually concerns and questions dressed up as problem statements. Prospects use these objections to make sure they are receiving all the information they need from the sales presenter. They also use them to reassure themselves about a decision they have already made.

In other words, the prospect likes you and your service and believes you can provide value by solving their problems. At that point, prospects just want to be 100 percent sure that they understand exactly what you’ll do. These good objections are last-ditch efforts to verify that everything is as great as they think it is. Assuming the salesperson answers the objections reasonably, it’s a done deal.

Whether the objective is bad, good or neutral, avoid acting annoyed, troubled or irritated by it. Try not to be flustered by the objection. If you are caught off guard, you can always look up the information or bring in a colleague for assistance. Never be patronizing or condescending in your answers. It’s a good idea to prepare for a wide variety of objections and rehearse your responses. Have answers ready to go that can either reassure prospects, reverse negative feelings or nudge them across the finish line.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

Click here to subscribe to Jeff’s weekly articles!http://bit.ly/1l86RC6

Click here to see sample videos of Jeff speaking to live audiences!  http://bit.ly/1gZqcoA 

You are welcome to forward this article with author citation to anyone who might benefit from it. 

Personal Branding’s Attitudinal Framework

By Jeff Beals

Mastering the art of personal branding, or what I like to call “Self Marketing Power,” requires a certain attitude.

You can’t market yourself if you have nothing to market. That means you must work hard at all times. Marketing without solid performance behind it is but a lie. As you promote yourself, you must constantly work hard. The harder you work and the more you produce, the more confident you will feel, and therefore your self marketing efforts will come across better. This creates a snowball effect, because the better your self marketing is, the more opportunities you will have to be productive.

A self marketer with a good work ethic will search for opportunities everywhere. Be curious. Sometimes the best opportunities come from the places you least expect. Constantly be on the lookout for opportunities to promote yourself. Pounce when the opportunities show up.

To be effective in self promotion you must think big and take risks. Sometimes you have to step out of your comfort zone. Perhaps you are somewhat shy or are new to your business and thus intimidated by industry veterans. Don’t waste time on fear and worry. It leads to dis- appointment and inaction.

For many people, their first forays into self marketing are small. That’s a fine way to gain experience and build self confidence. Grassroots self marketing can start very humbly. The key is to keep building up your efforts. You will never gain the highest levels of name recognition and respect if you don’t do something big at some point. Once you break through the big risk “barrier,” all subsequent activities will not seem like such a big deal.

There is an old saying that life comes down to just a few big moments. Don’t let timidity prevent you from seizing big opportunities in your life.

Self marketing is a positive-sum game, not a zero-sum game. Everyone can win. Just because one person becomes a rock star in an industry or community doesn’t mean that someone else cannot. Some people, even some successful ones, have a difficult time understanding this.

No doubt you have come across someone who can’t stand hearing praise about someone else. You say something nice about someone else, and that person feels compelled to refute it, bring up a negative thing about the person or at least minimize it with a quick barb or roll of the eyes.

Anyone who behaves like this is telling the rest of the world that he or she has a low self esteem or a compromised sense of self worth. One of the most important rules of the self marketing game is to never tear down others while promoting yourself. In fact, we should take this rule so seriously that we should go out of our way to build others up as we promote ourselves. Nothing looks so bad as to come across as jealous, envious or spiteful.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

Click here to subscribe to Jeff’s weekly articles!http://bit.ly/1l86RC6

Click here to see sample videos of Jeff speaking to live audiences!  http://bit.ly/1gZqcoA 

You are welcome to forward this article with author citation to anyone who might benefit from it. 

When You Cut Through the Clutter, THIS Is the Purpose of a Sales Presentation

By Jeff Beals

A sales presentation is your pitch.

More specifically, the presentation is your formal chance to present how your company’s attributes are beneficial to the prospect. It’s a chance to show how you provide value and how you can solve a prospect’s unique problems.

Sales presentations tend to occur after earlier preparatory sales work has been completed.

Before meeting in person, the prospect has probably been exposed to the company’s brand through the mass media. The company has no doubt sent marketing materials via mail or electronic means and communicated over the telephone. Ideally, much of the detective work would have been completed before the formal pitch.

During pre-meeting phone conversations, the salesperson should have asked the prospects numerous questions to find their pain points and determine what they truly value. The presentation is another step in your quest to move a prospect up the relationship depth chart, which starts with rapport, leads to a relationship, builds trust and ultimately gets a deal done.

Although the presentation is your chance to highlight yourself and your company, there is still plenty of opportunity to listen. That’s important, because you can never know enough about a prospect and listening strengthens relationships.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

Click here to subscribe to Jeff’s weekly articles!http://bit.ly/1l86RC6

Click here to see sample videos of Jeff speaking to live audiences!  http://bit.ly/1gZqcoA 

You are welcome to forward this article with author citation to anyone who might benefit from it.