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You’re Being Watched So Act Accordingly

man shaving in car

By Jeff Beals

Once upon a time, two salesmen – a long-time veteran and a newbie in his first week on the job – visited the CEO of a medium-sized company hoping to sell services to her.

The meeting went so well that the CEO agreed to purchase what the salesmen had to offer. They quickly wrote up a contract and had her sign it. All three people had smiles on their faces as the salesmen shook the owner’s hand, thanked her for her business and headed toward the elevator lobby.

As they waited for the elevator, the veteran sales rep proudly said to the new guy, “You see buddy, I told you this job is easy. Selling to these suckers is like shootin’ fish in a barrel. They don’t even have a chance!”

As soon as he said it, he wished he could retract his words.

At just that moment, the CEO, the person with whom they had signed a deal moments earlier, walked by. She heard every word and was patently insulted. She grabbed the contract out of the new guy’s hand and ripped it in half.

What was once a “done deal” suddenly became a costly blunder.

What a waste of time, effort and money! It took quite a bit of time for the sales reps to get to that point in the selling process. They had to conduct background research on the company and the CEO. It required persistence to get past the gatekeeping secretary and land that appointment. They had to prepare a customized sales presentation to win over the CEO. In the end, all of that work was for naught.

Failing to take care of the little things can sabotage your success.

Many years ago, I found myself needing to fill an open position in my department. It was a good job, and a number of people applied. But there was one candidate in particular who stood out. He was uniquely qualified, and I was excited to interview him.

About 30 minutes before the scheduled interview time, I looked out my office window and saw a well-dressed guy shaving in the parking lot. He had an electric razor in his hand and was using the reflection of himself in his car window as a mirror. Sure enough, that guy turned out to be the candidate. It was not an impressive way to start his job interview.

No matter what you do or who you are, it pays to remember this: You are being watched! Somebody is always listening to what you say!

The little things you do when you assume nobody is watching or listening can devastate your career.

I’m not advocating paranoia. Trust me; I sometimes do or say things I should not. Like many people, I have occasionally paid a price for stupid things I have done or said. But I’m generally safe when I assume that people are listening to what I say and watching what I do.

In our ultra-connected world, the metaphorical camera and the metaphorical microphone are always on…So beware.

Oh, and sometimes it’s not just metaphorical - it’s often real cameras and real microphones that capture our less-than-stellar moments.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

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Bizarre Client Provides Another Reason to Qualify

stop wasting my time

By Jeff Beals

Many years ago, when I first started working in commercial real estate, I learned something new about prospective-client qualification.

One day a man walked into our office. He had just moved to my city from a different part of the company, and he brought some impressive ideas with him. He wanted to interview our real estate company in order to have us represent him as he developed property and built major buildings in his new city. His ideas were downright grandiose, and he assured us he had access to unlimited capital. He told captivating stories and dropped big names.

Even though I was a newbie, an alarm went off in my head. This guy sounded too good to be true. My boss was equally skeptical. Our initial thought was to just laugh about the meeting and not waste our time with the guy.  But there was something that kept pulling us back. Something about the guy seemed genuine, so we decided to do a little background research on him.

Background Research

For the most, his stories actually checked out. We learned he had been involved in some significant real estate deals if not as big as what he was proposing to us. We found evidence that he had done work with a couple of the big names he mentioned. A banking reference he gave us was legitimate. We learned that a couple other companies had signed on to work with him including a widely respected business consultant and a major architecture firm.

While it still seemed too good to be true, we decided to move forward at least for a while with this guy.  Though we were suspicious he could accomplish his plans, a couple questions in the back of our minds kept haunting us: What if he IS legitimate and we pass up the opportunity? What if we walk away and one of our competitors ends up doing this once-in-a-career project with him?

As we proceeded, this man ended up demanding an extraordinary amount of my time, which eventually made me feel suspicious again. But after a while, we came to a moment of truth, a chance for him to prove himself. The client decided to make an offer on a prominent piece of real estate. We wrote up the contract, and he produced a sizable cashier’s check for the earnest deposit.  Finally, this strange man with the visionary ideas put up some real cash and signed a purchase agreement!

Due Diligence

During the due diligence period following that contract, the client took even more of our time, but instead of focusing on the matter at hand – closing this deal – he was focused on other, bigger properties he wanted.  His head was in the clouds. I became more and more frustrated, because the guy wouldn’t focus on first-things-first. How could we conquer the local real estate market if he couldn’t even focus long enough to close the first deal?!!?

As I pushed him, his personality changed. He got downright weird – confrontational and combative. It was frankly kind of disturbing. Some of his other advisers (architect, lender, attorney, etc.) were noticing the same thing.

At the last minute, he came up with a crazy excuse and killed the deal just as the due diligence period was about to expire. Many people had worked long and hard for absolutely nothing.

What did the mysterious client do next?

He asked us all to start working on another property he claimed to want.  This one was even bigger and the plans he had for it were even more fanciful.

Moving On

That’s when I finally had enough. My real estate firm cut ties with him.  Some of the other companies that had been working him followed suit.

That was many years ago. The would-be, life-changing client never ended up purchasing or developing a single, solitary property in my city. He moved away many years ago presumably to pull the same charade somewhere else. I haven’t heard from him at all in that time. Just out of curiosity, I have Googled him a few times over the years and very little shows up.

I can remember him once telling me that he preferred “to fly under the radar.”  I’ve heard that from other prospective clients and vendors over the years. Without exception, every person who has said those words to me has turned out to be illegitimate in some way.  If you ever want me to run away from you and never ask to do business with you ever again, simply tell me you like “to fly under the radar”

Other than avoiding people who fly under the radar, what did I learn from this time-sucking client?

Another thing to look for when qualifying prospects!

I had always thought qualification was about discovering their motives and determining their ability to perform financially.  In reality, qualification is about more than that. Some people are dreamers. Some people are wannabes.  Perhaps for some psychological reason I don’t understand, some people want to play fantasy business instead of accomplishing real things.

If you are willing to allow them, people will happily usurp your time even for things that don’t necessarily make sense for you.  I try to remind myself that the qualification process is all about elimination. We need to eliminate posers, pretenders and usurpers before they can steal your most precious resource: time.

I’m glad the strange man came into my professional life all those years ago. The time I wasted with him back then turned out to be quite valuable. I’m much more efficient today and my eyes are more keenly aware because of what I learned back then.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

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11 Ways Sales Strategy & Prospecting Go Together

sales meeting

By Jeff Beals

There are so many things to consider when developing a sales strategy and then carrying it out. Here are eleven pieces of advice that will help you sign more deals:

Spend time developing both your strategies and tactics and allocate adequate resources toward both.

Strategic planning must wait until the organization has clearly established its culture and understands what it is and what it never wants to be.

Honestly assess where you stand vis-à-vis your competition in the arena of public opinion.

Goals should be a product of your dreams and be in harmony with your core values.

In determining your target audience, focus on exactly what kinds of clients you need to succeed.

Go where the prospects are. Meet them where they live. Develop rapport, build relationships with them, establish trust and close deals.

Start with the low-hanging fruit when prospecting but be prepared to go to whatever lengths are necessary to find the right kinds of clients.

Live and breathe your sales territory Know it like the back of your hand. Own it.

Build a “war room,” which is a place where you can spread out confidential trade information and display it without the worry of an outsider seeing it.

Never go back on any promise made to any prospective client.

Honor your strategic plan, but always stand ready to tweak it and adjust on the fly.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

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Winning Business from Adidas

adidas show

By Jeff Beals

For some reason, certain companies have a prestigious feel to them. There’s just something about their brands that catches your interest and makes you pay close attention.

I’ve always considered athletic shoe companies to be prestigious and desirable. Nike, Under Armour and Adidas – those brands really grab my attention. As a kid, I was obsessed with athletic shoes. I still think those products are cool to this day.

Perhaps that’s why a story I heard recently peaked my interest.

I was watching an educational video program produced by the Lipsey Company that was designed to teach real estate brokers how to be more effective salespersons. During the program, the speaker told a story about a big-time corporate lease negotiation for space in a class-A office building.

A real estate broker represented a high-rise office building in Atlanta’s affluent Buckhead district. The broker’s job was to market the space for lease and negotiate lease terms with prospective office tenants on behalf of the owner.

One day the listing broker received a call from a competing broker who represented Adidas.

Hearing that a prestigious multinational company like Adidas is considering your office building is music to a listing broker’s ears.

The listing broker, the building manager and the owner of the building all wanted Adidas bad, but several other office buildings were being considered. The competition for Adidas would be fierce. To win the business and land Adidas as a tenant, the team marketing the Buckhead building would have to pull out all the stops.

They did just that.

When the Adidas team arrived at the Buckhead building, they found a professionally produced sign reserving the closest parking stall for them. As soon as they got out of their car, they were greeted by seven people representing the building – the broker, property managers, owner representatives, building engineers, etc.

Guess what — All seven of them were wearing brand-new Adidas tennis shoes!

The lead broker greeted the Adidas team and said, “First of all, we love your products. Secondly, we would love to have you in our building.”

The extra care and attention paid off. A short time later, the broker learned that Adidas chose the Buckhead Building.  A full-floor lease in a high-rent office district translated into a hefty commission check!

Whether you are trying to make an impression on Adidas, or a lesser known person/company, a little extra effort can really pay dividends.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

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Networking Success: How to Be a Forgiving Conversationalist

By Jeff Beals

The key to success in any networking conversation is your ability and willingness to listen. In fact, I recommend you listen two-thirds of the time and speak only one-third of the time whenever you strike up a conversation at a networking event.

I call it “The Rule of Thirds.”  Two-thirds of the time should be focused on the other person and one-third of the time reserved for whatever you think is important.

I was presenting a networking workshop for a large group of sales professionals a few years ago when one of the attendees approached me during a break. His name was Anthony.

“You know that whole ‘listen-two-thirds-of-the-time’ stuff you talk about?” he said. “Well, I do that. But how come nobody ever tries to do it back to me? Why am I the only one who listens? People are so self-absorbed. Why doesn’t anyone try to listen to me two-thirds of the time?”

He was frustrated that despite how hard he worked to show interest in others, nobody seemed to reciprocate.

I thought about his observation and said, “If you think about it, Anthony, it’s really quite a blessing. After all, if everyone followed the Rule of Thirds we would have a mathematical problem right?”

If people let you do the questioning and listening, they are essentially giving you all the power. The questioner leads and manipulates the conversation.

Forgiveness

If you are going to be effective as a networker, one of the first things you must do is become a forgiving person. For the better you become at interpersonal communications, the more you will notice how lousy at it the rest of us are.

Ultimately, you win when you make it about the other person. It’s always about them, not you. No matter how much they might deny it, the truth is that people really care most about themselves.

Don’t get discouraged if people are self-absorbed and don’t show much interest in learning about what you hold dear. If you listen to, comprehend and engage with what they are saying, they will love you. That will lead to sales, deals, agreements, job offers or whatever else you might be seeking.

While the virtue of forgiveness is important in networking, it is not the only skill you need. Here are some networking rules to keep in mind whether you’re rubbing shoulders with movers-and-shakers or simply mingling with prospective clients:

Start with a Purpose

Focus on results when networking. When you go to networking events, go with a goal in mind. Sure, you should try to enjoy the social aspects of your conversations, but make it your mission to meet new people, find a good lead and learn about a golden opportunity.

A Positive Face

When participating in any networking event, bring a positive attitude even if you don’t want to be there. People with energy and enthusiasm are more attractive to fellow networkers.

Focus

While you never know who could provide you with opportunities or valuable information, make your networking efficient by seeking out people in your target audience. Spend the preponderance of your time with people who can help you reach your goals in the shortest period of time.

Questions

Ultimately, networking should lead to some tangible benefit. You can push professional relationships forward in part by asking questions. Ask things that lead people down a path to your ultimate goal. You may find benefit in preparing questions ahead of time and rehearsing in your mind how you might ask such questions.

Valuable Leave-Behind

You should leave discussion partners with an item of value but this is nothing you can see, taste or touch. It’s intangible – something like a joke, piece of trivia or a bit of interesting insider information. These intangible leave-behinds make you and your message more memorable.

Observe the Masters

If you are shy or awkward in professional networking situations, you can improve by observing the masters, those people who are naturally gifted at making small talk, working the room and connecting people. Emulate what they do well and you may eventually become a master yourself.

Make a commitment to network more and remember to do it deliberately with a purpose. Showing up at public venues frequently over a long period of time will increase your public profile, connect you with the right people and help you become that person who always seems to know about business and political happenings long before your colleagues do.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

Click here to subscribe to Jeff’s weekly articles!

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Learn How Personal Branding Can Improve Your Sales & Marketing Abilities!Download this Complimentary eBook Today: “Self Marketing Power 101″ >>

What Can You Learn from the Demise of Candlestick Park?

candlestick-park

By Jeff Beals

Candlestick Park opened to great fanfare in 1960. It was a gleaming new stadium that would serve as home field for both the San Francisco Giants baseball team and the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League.

Legendary baseball and football players competed in the stadium for many decades until it finally closed following the 2013 football season. Nowadays the Giants play in downtown San Francisco in the picturesque AT&T Park. The 49ers moved to the brand-new Levi’s Stadium in suburban Santa Clara.

I have always considered empty stadiums to be kind of depressing.  During games or special events, they are loud and full of the buzz generated by thousands of spectators.  When no event is going on, those cavernous stadiums are eerily quiet. Even more depressing is a closed stadium, an out-of-business stadium like Candlestick.

As time goes by things inevitably change. As you read this article, wrecking balls are slowly tearing Candlestick apart piece by piece. By May, there should be nothing left of the old stadium where Joe Montana led the 49ers to multiple championships. In a couple months, the site of the 1989 World Series (and simultaneously the national television coverage of the Loma Prieta Earthquake) will be bare ground ready for redevelopment.

So what’s going to happen to the field where Willie Mays once played? What will happen after Candlestick is completely razed?

They’re going to build a shopping center.

Well, not just a shopping center. It will be a mixed-use development with a “luxury-outlet” mall, hotel rooms and thousands of homes. It will be quite nice; I’ve seen the architects’ renderings. It will be a rebirth for a piece of land that had been vacated.

As the saying goes, change is the only constant in life.

The land under Candlestick Park is too valuable to allow a rotting stadium to languish on it for years and years.  New opportunities are waiting.  Everyone needs to adapt and keep up with the changing times.

The owners of valuable land must make sure their investment is being maximized even if it means removing something that is nostalgic to thousands of people.  The public no longer wants an aging stadium devoid of the desirable amenities new stadiums offer.

We all have to keep up – both with the times and with the changing preferences of our customers/clients.

That means we have to be prepared for change. Unlike some people, I don’t believe you necessarily have to “embrace” change, but you do have to manage it and learn to thrive while it is happening.

Change for the sake of change tends to be a mistake, but change that leads to a healthy renewal is necessary for long-term success.

Are you doing whatever it takes to stay fresh and relevant?

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

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Cut Down on the Amount of Time You Spend in Meetings

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By Jeff Beals

Comedian Fred Allen once quipped, “A committee is a group of men, who individually can do nothing but as a group decide that nothing can be done.”

Few things cause professionals to roll their eyes in disgust more than a disorganized, unnecessary meeting. In today’s professional world, there are simply too many meetings. A significant portion of the meetings we attend are simply unnecessary. Even if a meeting is needed, the majority of time during that meeting is filled with unnecessary content.

Step One

The first step in escaping the meeting trap is to avoid meetings whenever possible. If you are in charge, try to find ways that your people can be empowered to make individual decisions at the lowest level possible. Good organizations should expect professional team members to keep each other informed, but for the most part, they should be encouraged to behave as confident individuals.

If your presence is not essential, try to get out of going. Don’t go to meetings just for the sake of making your calendar look more impressive. If you don’t have an active role in the meeting, and assuming your boss isn’t ordering you to attend, try to get out of it. Professional success is measured by results, power, influence, impact on the world and compensation, not by the number of meetings you attend each week.

If you must go, there are ways of making it more efficient. Only invite people who are absolutely necessary. Set a time limit. If you are leading the meeting, create an agenda in advance. Stick to the agenda and don’t allow participants to stray too far from it. Use good meeting facilitation techniques to keep it moving. You will have to periodically bring people back when they go off on verbal tangents.

Another thing: never allow more than three meetings to take place on the same subject before a final decision is made.

Multi-Tasking

When I must attend a meeting in which I do not have an active role, I bring paperwork with me or handle emails on my phone. I sit in the corner or back of the room and am productive while the meeting is going on. If you do this discreetly, most people won’t mind.

This is not to say all meetings are bad. In an era of business when collaboration is important, we need face-to-face time. The key is to make meetings valuable.

Otherwise you can “meeting” yourself to death and start to live like a politician. Nobody goes to more meetings than a politician as attested by these poignant quotes:

“I have left orders to be awakened at any time in case of national emergency, even if I’m in a cabinet meeting.” – President Ronald Reagan.

“Congress seems drugged and inert most of the time… its idea of meeting a problem is to hold hearings, or in extreme cases, to appoint a commission.” – Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

Click here to subscribe to Jeff’s weekly articles!

Click here to see sample videos of Jeff speaking to live audiences!

Learn How Personal Branding Can Improve Your Sales & Marketing Abilities!Download this Complimentary eBook Today: “Self Marketing Power 101″ >>

The Real Purpose of a Sales Presentation

Presenting to a Doc

By Jeff Beals

There shall be no sales presentation until it’s time!

Too often sales pros launch into a well-rehearsed and finely polished demonstration of all they offer.  You don’t want to do that, however, until you have determined exactly who the prospect is, what they value and how your products/services specifically deliver what they value.

Then, and only then, do you start to “sell.”

A sales presentation is your pitch. More specifically, the presentation is your formal chance to present how your company’s attributes are beneficial to the prospect. It’s a chance to show how you provide value and how you can solve a prospect’s unique problems. Sales presentations tend to occur after earlier preparatory sales work has been completed.

Pre-Meeting Detective Work

Ideally, sales pros complete much of their detective work (prospect research) before meeting in person.  At the beginning of the meeting you are searching for answers while building rapport.  The first in-person meeting is a chance to go deeper, learning things you can’t simply find through a Google search.

The presentation is another step in your quest to move a prospect through the selling process. Although the presentation is your chance to highlight yourself and your company, there is still plenty of opportunity to listen. That’s important, because you can never know enough about a prospect and listening strengthens relationships. Even as you’re presenting be alert for opportunities to stop and listen.

Words as Art

Not only does a good sales presentation show exactly how a product/service solves a prospective client’s problem, it also paints a picture. Your presentation should make it easy for prospects to imagine themselves using, enjoying and benefiting from whatever it is that you are selling.

While the word presentation implies that the seller is delivering a formal speech to the buyer, a sales presentation should not be one-sided. It must be customized and adapted to each prospect’s needs. As the late Zig Ziglar once said, “People do things for their reasons, not yours.”

Focus on what the prospect values during the presentation and take time to draw them in by asking clarifying questions and tying things back to what they told you during earlier communications.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

Click here to subscribe to Jeff’s weekly articles!

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Learn How Personal Branding Can Improve Your Sales & Marketing Abilities!Download this Complimentary eBook Today: “Self Marketing Power 101″ >>

You’re Like a Stand-Up Comedian (Even If You’re Not Terribly Funny)

stand up comedian

By Jeff Beals

Have you ever attended a show at a stand-up comedy club? If you haven’t perhaps you have watched a television show recorded live at a comedy club. Either way, you’re probably familiar with how it works, because comedy clubs around the world tend to have the same structure.

On any given night, three or four comedians are booked in the club. The most famous of these comedians is called the “headliner” and he goes on stage last. But before the headliner begins his routine, two or three “warm-up acts,” lesser known comedians, take the stage.

Every time I have attended a stand-up comedy show, without fail, at least one or more of the warm-up acts will actually be funnier than the headliner. It always happens!

But guess who gets the biggest applause, the uproarious laughter and the standing ovation? You guessed it – the headliner. Even if the headliner is the fourth funniest comedian out of four, he still gets all the glory.

Why is that?

It’s because audiences want the famous comedian to be the funniest comedian. Even if he is not that funny at all, people subconsciously pretend he is because he is famous.

That is a perfect example of “the power of celebrity.” People tend to respect, admire and give deference to well-known people even if those people have not necessarily earned that respect. It is human nature and it’s something we can take advantage of in our daily work.

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While you may have no plans to become a professional comedian, you can exploit human nature to suit your goals by becoming a celebrity in your own sphere of interest. Your sphere of interest is that group of people, who in any way, can help you reach your goals – clients, prospective clients, anyone who could refer a client, a potential employer, someone who could get you on a coveted committee or board. In other words, there are thousands and thousands of people who could have an impact on your success and they compose your sphere of interest.

Among those people, you need to be a celebrity, a person with a widely recognized and highly respected personal brand.

When you become a celebrity in your own sphere of interest, people will be more interested in what you have to say. They will be pleased to be seen next to you. They will talk about you to other people. Perception is reality. Even if you are no more talented than the next person, you can get ahead of that person by having celebrity status in your own sphere of interest.

Developing a level of celebrity is simply one of the single most important things you can do to further your career or grow your business. I’m not saying you need to develop a name as widely recognized as a movie star’s, a senator’s or a famous CEO’s, but within your field of expertise, you need to become a mini rock star. If you’re in business, you should strive to be a celebrity in your marketplace or your industry. Name recognition is power.

So how do you become a celebrity in your own sphere of interest? For starters, be excellent in your work. Never stop preparing and planning. Be disciplined and work hard. Do something that’s worthy of being a celebrity in your sphere of interest.

Unfortunately, however, excellence is far from enough. In this competitive world, your talent and hard work are simply expected. Performance is merely foundational. Assume your competition is working just as hard as you and is even more talented than you. In such an environment, your celebrity status and personal brand are among the few things that set you apart.

As a celebrity in your own sphere of interest, you need to be active and involved. Go the extra mile to meet people and stay in touch with them after you meet. Be highly visible in your profession and your geographic marketplace. If you make a consistent effort to establish solid professional relationships with as many people as possible it will pay off.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

Click here to subscribe to Jeff’s weekly articles!

Click here to see sample videos of Jeff speaking to live audiences!

Learn How Personal Branding Can Improve Your Sales & Marketing Abilities!Download this Complimentary eBook Today: “Self Marketing Power 101″ >>

Sales Advice: You Can’t Afford to Be Out-Hustled

hustle up

By Jeff Beals

Work-life balance is critically important, but ultimately success in sales still requires hard work. To reach the pinnacle of your industry, you most likely have to work harder, smarter and more creatively than your competition.

You can’t afford to be out-hustled by the competition. There’s always a lot at stake.

Here are eight ways to keep you hustling and on the right track to successful selling:

  1. At the company level, there needs to be a full commitment to marketing and selling. Some companies are “selling organizations.” Others don’t put enough focus on the attraction and development of new clients.
  2. Being successful requires diligence. Things fall apart quickly when you avert your focus.
  3. Successful organizations think about marketing and selling 365 days a year. Same thing applies to individual salespeople who want to be in the top 10 percent.
  4. Serious professionals are willing to do whatever it takes to seal the deal. If necessary, they take extraordinary measures to win a prospect’s favor. Despite this commitment, however, they never cut ethical corners.
  5. Avoid being a “situational salesperson,” someone who only excels as long as they are in their comfort zone. A situational salesperson struggles when things change suddenly or unexpected external events occur. Be ready and willing to adapt to a shifting playing field.
  6. To stay relevant in your business, keep up with the times. Don’t resist the change-forces that are bigger than you.
  7. Think the way your clients think. Your client determines what is valuable, not you.
  8. Passion is required to succeed at the highest levels, so make sure you work in a field you truly enjoy. It’s much easier to get up in the morning if you love selling what you sell.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

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