Ego Management: How to Make the Smartest People Part of Your Life

By Jeff Beals

You have probably heard the saying, “To be successful, surround yourself with people who are smarter than you are.”

For better or worse, that hasn’t been terribly difficult for me.  I’ve been blessed with many intelligent, talented people in my career – colleagues, bosses, direct reports and friends.  I’m a better person and a more successful professional because of the gifted people in my life.

Whether you’re at work or in your personal life, surround yourself with smart and talented people.  If you are in a leadership position, hire people who are smarter than you.

Of course, that is easier said than done.

Surrounding yourself with more talented people can be very intimidating.  And a blow to the ego.  And even threatening!  Nevertheless, move forward with faith and conviction that you will be better served by teaming up people who are better than you at certain things.

Hiring Talented People

As a leader, have no fear of hiring people you think might pass you up some day.  It is better to be seen as a person who brings in and develops great talent than a person who protects the status quo by hiring mediocre or under-performing people.

Don’t Hide the Light under a Bushel

When you do end up employing an ultra-talented, hardworking individual, don’t try to hide them or prevent them from moving up just because you don’t want to lose them.  Great talent rises to the top.  Let the exceptional person move up.  In the long run, it will benefit you as they will remember and appreciate the role you played in boosting their career.  A former employee who makes it big can become a huge ally for you in the future.

Friends and Colleagues

Regardless of your professional role, identify talented friends and colleagues and build close relationships with them.  Another old saying tells us that you tend to become who you hang out with.  “You become the sum of your five best friends.”  Spending time with exceptional people makes you more exceptional.

Have a Mentor and Become One Too

Mentorship is one of the best professional development tools in existence.  We benefit both by being mentored and by mentoring others.  Find a successful role model and use that person as your mentor.  Some mentors don’t even have to know they are your mentor – just study them and do the things they do.  Other mentor relationships might be more formal.  At that same time, mentor someone yourself.  You actually become better in your work by teaching and coaching junior colleagues.  As I once wrote in a previous article, you don’t know it until you’ve taught it.  Mentorship is a classic win-win situation.

Different Intelligences

Here’s something that might help salve a bruised ego resulting from hanging around smarter people:  There are different kinds of intelligence.

Just because a colleague is smarter than you in one area doesn’t mean he or she is better in another.  Perhaps you struggle with creativity and idea-generation but have superior analytical skills.  Team up with the creative person and together you can accomplish more.  You might not be as quick to pick up operational details as a certain person but maybe you are better at building relationships and navigating institutional politics.

When it comes to intelligence and talent, we all need to identify our top strengths and biggest weaknesses.  You can maximize your strengths and mitigate your weaknesses by joining forces with people whose abilities complement your own.

Accountability

If you hire a team of exceptional people, it will be important to have a culture of accountability in your office.  Top performers expect to be held accountable and they expect that other employees in the company will be too.  Perhaps the most important person to hold accountable is yourself.  If you hold yourself to a high standard as a leader, your talented employees (even the ones more naturally gifted than you) will respect you and hold you in high esteem.

Speaking of “accountability,” I’m offering a webinar on June 5th at 10 a.m. Central Time called “How to Hold Your Sales Team Accountable.”

You’ll learn HOW TO:

1. Use 4 simple metrics that make it impossible for sales reps to hide weekly output and results
2. Implement 11 steps that will create a culture of sales accountability in your company.
3. Get reps to buy in to your accountability plan.

Investing just one hour of your time and only $49 will translate into bigger revenues, less stress and a happier work environment for everyone!

You are not going to want to miss out on this.  Register TODAY!

Jeff Beals shows you how to find better prospects, close more deals and capture greater market share.  Jeff is an international award-winning author, sought-after keynote speaker, and accomplished sales consultant.  He has spoken in 5 countries and 41 states.  A frequent media guest, Jeff has been featured in Investor’s Business Daily, USA Today, Men’s Health, Chicago Tribune and The New York Times.”

(402) 637-9300

How Do You Know If Your Company Lacks Sales Accountability?

By Jeff Beals

 

Nobody wants to be micromanaged, but today’s ambitious professionals do crave some level of accountability.  That’s especially true of sales practitioners, because they know accountability helps them make more money. 

 

While people thrive when working in a culture of healthy accountability, 91 percent of sales reps nationwide say “lack of accountability” is a major problem in their companies.  In fact, 46 percent of managers worldwide do a poor job of holding their teams accountable, according to a Harvard Business Review study. 

 

What about your company?  Do you have a lack of sales accountability in your organizational culture? 

 

It can be difficult to discern whether your company has a sales accountability problem, because you’re so close to the situation.  When you’re immersed in your work on a daily basis, it’s hard to get an unbiased look at what’s really happening. 

 

That’s why I’m providing you with the following list of factors that indicate your company may lack a sales accountability culture:

 

1. Plateaued or declining numbers.

 

2. Difficulty retaining top producers.

 

3. Difficulty recruiting top producers (Talent attracts talent.  Similarly, a lack of talent in an office is patently obvious to highly talented prospective employees).

 

4. Sales managers who appear to be more interested in building friendships with team members instead of being bosses.

 

5. The sales team lacks clear, quantifiable, unambiguous and regularly monitored goals both for the team overall and for each individual rep.

 

6. Sales managers aren’t having at least monthly one-on-one meetings with each sales rep.  If they do have these meetings the sales managers aren’t getting specific information from reps about results and pipeline progress. 

 

7. Sales managers utter vague, meaningless “motivational” phrases such as “We are tracking behind this quarter and need to take up our game to the next level,” or “Let’s get after it!”

 

8. Sales reps do not engage in healthy competition among themselves.

 

9. Sales reps talk more about their busy activities (like meetings, emails and phone calls) than their actual results. 

 

10. There is confusion and ambiguity about sales procedures, territory divisions, new product launches, etc.

 

11. Basic procedures keep getting changed for no apparent reason, which makes reps less confident and motivated. 

 

12.  Social loafing has crept into the sales department.  “Social loafing” is the tendency of individuals to put forth less effort when they are part of a group. Because all members of the group are pooling their efforts to achieve a common goal, each member of the group contributes less than they would if they were individually responsible.  This is more likely to happen in departments in which a lot of team-based selling takes place.

 

Do you see any of these problems in you company?  If you have one or two of them, you will want to address them, but your performance is probably fine.  If you have several of them, you got some work to do immediately.  A strong culture of sales accountability pushes all sales reps forward and maximizes revenue.

 

The good news is that you can hold your team accountable and it doesn’t have to be difficult or uncomfortable!

 

P.S. I’m offering a webinar on June 5th at 10 a.m. Central Time called “How to Hold Your Sales Team Accountable.”

 

You’ll learn HOW TO:


1. Use 4 simple metrics that make it impossible for sales reps to hide weekly output and results
2. Implement 11 steps that will create a culture of sales accountability in your company.
3. Get reps to buy in to your accountability plan.

 

Investing just one hour of your time and only $49 will translate into bigger revenues, less stress and a happier work environment for everyone!

 

You are not going to want to miss out on this.  Register TODAY!

Perpetual Prospecting Is the Key to Beating the Sales Cycle

By Jeff Beals

Do you invest in the stock market?

If so, you’re probably aware of the constant waxing and waning that characterizes the life cycle of the stock market. What goes up eventually goes down and what goes down eventually goes up.

If you’re a long-term investor, you tend to wait out the market cycles and instead count on the long-term growth that has always happened in the market over extended periods of time.  If you’re a short-term investor, you may be playing the cycle, hoping to buy or sell at precisely the right time.

Either way, the stock market goes up and down.  When markets are optimistic, investors begin to feel enthusiasm, then exhilaration.  Eventually, it starts to feel like you’re invincible, that every investment you make pays off.  That false belief compels some investors to make reckless decisions and take questionable risks.

Just as the stock market reaches its feverish peak, the bull market ends.  Most people don’t realize it right away, and investors often go through a period of denial.  But eventually pessimism sets in, which leads to panic and then despair: the bear market.  Of course, when people are depressed at the bottom of the trough, that’s when things slowly start to trend upwards, starting the whole cycle over again.

Sales practitioners tend to go through cycles quite analogous to the stock market: highs and lows, peaks and valleys.

At the peak of the prospecting cycle, the “bull market,” you have so many deals to close and so much easy business that you’re tempted to put off prospecting activities.  Of course, that eventually leads to an empty pipeline.  When you realize you have no prospects in the pipe, you prospect like crazy, which eventually leads to another up cycle.

If your personal sales cycle is too volatile, you are putting yourself under a great deal of stress.  There’s one secret to evening out your cycle while keeping your revenue going up each year: perpetual prospecting.

Prospecting is the key. It’s the reason 20 percent of sales reps do 80 percent of the business (In some companies, it might be closer to 10/90).  It’s the reason why some sales reps do well even during a recession.  Prospecting separates the good from the great.

I like to define prospecting as “the art of interrupting someone when they don’t expect to hear from you in order to provide them with something they need that they might not yet know.”

As that definition implies, there is one aggressive part of prospecting: “interrupting someone.”  But the rest of the definition implies that sales reps are doing prospects a favor by introducing them to something important: valuable products and services.

If you want to be a better prospector, and consequently make more money, here are five quick pieces of advice:

Prospect Life Your Life Depends on It

Your sales life DOES depend on prospecting.  Ideally, you should consider prospecting to be a mindset, a way of life and a fundamental part of your company’s culture.  When things are going well and you’re closing so many sales you can hardly keep up, you still need to carve out at least a little time for prospecting.

Be an Opportunity Detective

Turn over every rock and scratch the dirt.  Opportunities are often buried layers below the surface.  Keep in mind that every person you meet could potentially lead to business and that prospects can theoretically be found any place you go.

Apply Discipline to Your Prospecting

In order to make sure you prospect perpetually, block out a couple periods of time each week that are reserved for prospecting activities: telephone calls, personalized direct emails or showing up at prospects’ offices.  This time should be a non-negotiable calendar commitment not to be interrupted or rescheduled unless it’s an emergency.

Be Obsessed with Prospect Value

When you engage cold prospects, you want to talk about things you believe they value instead of talking about you or your company.  For instance, too many sales reps start prospecting messages with statements such as: “We’ve been in business since 1910,” or “We offer a full suite of IT solutions.”  Instead, research the prospect before contacting them and talk about what they value and then be ready to explain how the outcomes/results of your products and services satisfy those values.

Plan Ahead

Nobody plans to fail but sales practitioners regularly fail to plan.  I recommend you map out your weekly prospecting plan on Sunday evening or early Monday morning.  Decide who you’re going to contact and research those prospects ahead of time.  That way, when you get to your dedicated prospecting time, you’re focused on communicating instead of digging through websites and looking up LinkedIn profiles.  If you do anything other than communicating during dedicated prospecting time blocks, you’re wasting the prime calling hours.

Jeff Beals shows you how to find better prospects, close more deals and capture greater market share.  Jeff is an international award-winning author, sought-after keynote speaker, and accomplished sales consultant.  He has spoken in 5 countries and 41 states.  A frequent media guest, Jeff has been featured in Investor’s Business Daily, USA Today, Men’s Health, Chicago Tribune and The New York Times.”

Here’s Why Should You Choose Jeff Beals as Your Next Speaker:

“Jeff Beals has presented four different topics at five of our internal events this year. At each event, the audience of commercial real estate principals and agents was completely engaged and motivated the entire time. Jeff facilitates his training sessions in such a way that each member of the audience was able to relate and understand how to apply it every day in the field. Jeff is brilliant, and we have hired him to continue speaking at our events next year!” – Lindsay Fierro, Senior Vice President, NAI Global, New York, NY

“Jeff Beals is a consummate pro. With short notice, he put together an engaging, fun, sales-focused presentation full of specifics – just what our exec team needed. We’ll ask him back for annual company retreat again next year.” – John Baylor, President, On to College, Lincoln, NE

“You brought great value to our event. The workshop was a huge experience for our attendees by giving them the opportunity to improve their work in the critical environment in which we are living today. Your talent as a speaker and your qualities as a person made the difference during your time with us. I would certainly recommend you to anyone who asks.” – Ana Paula Costa, Educational Planner, Febracorp, Sao Paulo, Brazil

(402) 637-9300