Tag Archives: business

How Can You Be More Entrepreneurial in Your Work?

By Jeff Beals

Somewhere between 5-to-10 percent of the population is entrepreneurial.

But what does that really mean?  Do you have to own a business to be entrepreneurial?  Absolutely not. In fact, there are a number of entrepreneurs who frankly are not very entrepreneurial.

In the United States, about 13 percent of adults own some sort of business.  Yet not all those people have truly entrepreneurial personalities.  Think about it…Half of all business owners fail within the first five years of operation.  Even among business owners who succeed, a decent-sized percentage are unhappy. One reason for their misery could be incongruence – perhaps they are non-entrepreneurial people working as entrepreneurs.

Just as some entrepreneurs aren’t terribly entrepreneurial, some traditional employees do have entrepreneurial personalities.

No matter what professional role you play in life, you can be more successful if you incorporate some level of entrepreneurial thinking and behavior into your work. In that spirit, here are some entrepreneurial characteristics you may want to make part of your professional life:

Moderate Risk-Taking – Stereotypically, entrepreneurs have a reputation for taking big risks. That’s not really accurate. Big risks have a low likelihood of panning out. Successful entrepreneurs are moderate risk takers. They don’t shy away from ambiguity if they believe opportunity is present, but they study and calculate before taking the risk.

If you work as an employee in an office setting, the same approach to risk-taking may help you. If you don’t take any risks, you may never get ahead or you may be subjected to a career of perpetual boredom. If you take calculated risks, you’re more likely to advance and enjoy your work.

Tolerance of Uncertainty – Entrepreneurial people don’t have excessive fear of failure. Any fear they do have, they use as motivation to keep working hard. Similarly, they don’t crave security. They can handle living with the unknown. That’s a particularly valuable characteristic, because even traditional jobs are riddled with uncertainty these days. When entrepreneurs do fail, they don’t let it ruin their lives. Instead, they see each setback as a learning experience.

Ego – Entrepreneurial people are somewhat egotistical. Obviously, you don’t want to be an obnoxious ass, but if you’re lacking in confidence, you should work on it. Entrepreneurs ultimately believe they will be successful. They believe hard work is an investment. They use their sense of ego as a driving motivator. It’s one of the things that keeps them focused and working hard even when they feel tired.  Entrepreneurs have a “social” ego as well in that they build relationships and enjoy having positive reputations. Even if you’re an introvert, constantly develop and refine your people skills, because working with and through others is critically important.

High Energy – It takes a lot of energy to power entrepreneurial efforts. That’s why entrepreneurial people are full of oomph.  If your energy level is not high enough, try changing your nutrition, sleep and exercise habits. Energetic people attract more attention and create more excitement. Similar to energy is perseverance. When things aren’t going well, entrepreneurial people double down and push harder.

Goal-Oriented – This might be the most important entrepreneurial characteristic. The more likely you are to set goals, monitor those goals and be driven by them, the more likely you are to reach the highest heights in your career.

Two Views on the World – Entrepreneurial people are diverse thinkers. They can simultaneously manage tactics while thinking strategically. They can work on short-term and long-term goals at the same time.

Integrity – This might come as a surprise to some people who think of entrepreneurs as ruthless, selfish types, however, the most consistently successful entrepreneurs exhibit high levels of integrity. No, they’re not saints, but they are generally ethical and care about other people. The longer people and organization exhibit consistent integrity, the more likely they will succeed.

So, what can you do to be more entrepreneurial in your work?  How can it benefit you?

An entrepreneur is not some super-human creature. An entrepreneur isn’t necessarily a business owner. Instead, an entrepreneur is someone who takes “ownership” of their life/job and uses the above characteristics as a pathway to success.

Jeff Beals shows you how to find better prospects, close more deals and capture greater market share.  Jeff is an international award-winning author, sought-after keynote speaker, and accomplished sales consultant. A frequent media guest, Jeff has been featured in Investor’s Business Daily, USA Today, Men’s Health, Chicago Tribune and The New York Times.”

Here’s Why Should You Choose Jeff Beals as Your Next Speaker:

“Jeff Beals has presented four different topics at five of our internal events in 2016. At each event, the audience of commercial real estate principals and agents was completely engaged and motivated the entire time. Jeff facilitates his training sessions in such a way that each member of the audience was able to relate and understand how to apply it every day in the field. Jeff is brilliant, and we have hired him to continue speaking at our events in 2017!” – Lindsay Fierro, Senior Vice President, NAI Global, New York, NY

“Your workshop was a huge experience for our attendees by giving them the opportunity to improve their work in the critical environment in which we are living today. Your talent as a speaker and your qualities as a person made the difference during your time with us. I would certainly recommend you to anyone who asks.” – Ana Paula Costa, Educational Planner, Febracorp, Sao Paulo, Brazil

I’m in Phoenix and had breakfast earlier this morning with our semi-retired sales representative who is doing some continued work for us here.  He attended your sales meeting last week and told me that in 43 years of selling, you were the best he had ever heard.  Thanks for a great experience.” – Drew Vogel, President & CEO, Diamond Vogel Paints, Orange City, IA

“Our corporate partnership team had great takeaways regarding how to network smarter while also understanding the importance of our personal brand to current and prospective partners. Jeff does a great job weaving in real-world examples and how you can apply his teachings to growing your business and building long-term partnerships.” – Jason Booker, Senior Director of Corporate Sponsorships, The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball Team

+1-402-917-5730

info@jeffbeals.com

The Danger of Dirty Corporate Words

By Jeff Beals

By now you’ve probably heard a great deal about United Airlines’ infamous “re-accommodation” of a passenger on a recent flight from Chicago O’Hare to Louisville, Kentucky.

Just in case you missed it, the plane was overbooked – as is too often the case with major airlines – meaning four passengers had to give up their seats.  Nobody volunteered to leave their seats despite large bribes (travel vouchers) being offered by United.  Eventually, the airline randomly chose four unlucky souls to be forced off the plane.  One of those passengers refused to leave. He was eventually dragged off the plane violently.  Videos showed the 69-year-old passenger screaming in pain while being dragged toward the exit. His face was bloodied.

Predictably, those videos went viral, leading to a firestorm of backlash against United Airlines. The whole incident is made worse when you consider that the passengers were already onboard and in their seats waiting to depart.

Did the passenger act improperly by refusing to leave private property (the airplane) after being ordered to do so? Technically, yes. Was his anger understandable?  Yes. Chronically bad treatment by airlines is maddening to paying customers. Is there something inherently wrong with overbooking planes and forcing paying customers to leave? Yes. How many other industries could get away with such a practice?

But for now, let’s set aside the argument as to whether or not the passenger should have cooperated and instead focus on United Airlines’ response.

The incident is being described as a public relations nightmare. It brings to light the controversial subject of overbooking. It’s a vivid reminder that airlines generally aren’t known for their customer service.  It reminds people of poor treatment they may have experienced on previous United flights.  The optics are never good when the big powerful corporation is perceived to be picking on the little guy.

Whenever a huge company makes a huge mistake the quality and speed of the response is critically important. PR experts almost uniformly agree that United botched it.

As I watched this story unfold, one word grabbed my attention and planted itself permanently in my head: “re-accommodated.”

United CEO Oscar Munez has fumbled and bumbled several statements since the incident, but of all his poorly chosen words, this statement takes the cake:

“This is an upsetting event to all of us here at United,” Munoz said. “I apologize for having to re-accommodate these customers.”

Re-accommodate?  Is that a sanitized, made-up word for “having your face rearranged while getting kicked off a plane you paid to ride?”

Comedians and others have had a lot of fun with that statement, joking about the painful process of “re-accommodation” and how the CEO of United needs to get “re-accommodated” to the unemployment line.

When I read Munoz’s use of “re-accommodated,” I was reminded of something that has always chaffed my ears – meaningless, politically correct, corporate double-speak.  It’s a long-standing problem in the business world and it shows no sign of going away anytime soon.

The business world is full of patronizing language.

A study by the Financial Times a few years ago indicated that fewer than 10 percent of business executives actually understood the meaning of commonly used corporate jargon and business buzzwords. The researchers surveyed nearly a thousand executives and found that “the overwhelming majority were unable to correctly explain the jargon they use on a daily basis.

The study described most of the surveyed executives as possessing “‘admittedly ignorant’ understanding of ‘very confusing’ management speak.” Nevertheless, the survey respondents admitted to using an average of five corporate buzzwords each day.

Whether they uttered the words in board rooms, in client meetings or social settings, the executives believed the words “made them look more professional or intelligent” and “cemented their positions of authority.”

Similarly, when uttered in front of the media as a way to cover up or lessen the impact of bad corporate behavior, executives believe pseudo-intellectual, misleading euphemisms protect their companies and preserve their images.

Nothing could be further from the truth.

Buzzwords, jargon and corporate double-speak are painful to the ear and patronizing to the brain. Those who use such “words” in the hope of sounding brilliant end up sounding anything but brilliant at least to those people who are good at seeing through nonsense. Those who use deceitful euphemisms to gloss over bad behavior lose all their credibility.

The business world has long been plagued by the use of hollow buzzwords. Resist the temptation! Use clear, concise language. Over the course of time, clear communicators are more respected than those whose mouths spew never-ending phrases of institutional bollocks.

Jeff Beals shows you how to find better prospects, close more deals and capture greater market share.  Jeff is an international award-winning author, sought-after keynote speaker, and accomplished sales consultant. A frequent media guest, Jeff has been featured in Investor’s Business Daily, USA Today, Men’s Health, Chicago Tribune and The New York Times.”

Here’s Why Should You Choose Jeff Beals as Your Next Speaker:

“Jeff Beals has presented four different topics at five of our internal events in 2016. At each event, the audience of commercial real estate principals and agents was completely engaged and motivated the entire time. Jeff facilitates his training sessions in such a way that each member of the audience was able to relate and understand how to apply it every day in the field. Jeff is brilliant, and we have hired him to continue speaking at our events in 2017!” – Lindsay Fierro, Senior Vice President, NAI Global, New York, NY

“Your workshop was a huge experience for our attendees by giving them the opportunity to improve their work in the critical environment in which we are living today. Your talent as a speaker and your qualities as a person made the difference during your time with us. I would certainly recommend you to anyone who asks.” – Ana Paula Costa, Educational Planner, Febracorp, Sao Paulo, Brazil

I’m in Phoenix and had breakfast earlier this morning with our semi-retired sales representative who is doing some continued work for us here.  He attended your sales meeting last week and told me that in 43 years of selling, you were the best he had ever heard.  Thanks for a great experience.” – Drew Vogel, President & CEO, Diamond Vogel Paints, Orange City, IA

“Our corporate partnership team had great takeaways regarding how to network smarter while also understanding the importance of our personal brand to current and prospective partners. Jeff does a great job weaving in real-world examples and how you can apply his teachings to growing your business and building long-term partnerships.” – Jason Booker, Senior Director of Corporate Sponsorships, The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball Team

+1-402-917-5730

info@jeffbeals.com

Is Cross-Selling Actually a Bad Thing???

By Jeff Beals

Thanks to widespread media coverage of the recent Wells Fargo fake-account scandal, the sales profession has a new villain.

It’s called, “cross-selling.”

And you might add another villain to the list:

“Sales culture.”

In Wells Fargo’s world, cross-selling is the practice of getting customers to open and use as many of the bank’s products and services as possible. Some critics have claimed the practice led to a sales culture that incentivized employees to open unauthorized accounts.

Wells Fargo was fined $190 million a few weeks ago for opening nearly 2 million accounts without obtaining permission from customers. Wells Fargo revealed it has fired 5,300 employees who were found to have defrauded customers.  Some employees have sued Wells, claiming they were pushed by management to engage in unsavory selling tactics.

The process has apparently been going on for quite some time as evidenced by this clip from a Fortune magazine article in 2009:

“Wells, more than any big bank, makes its money by lending. It focuses on consumers and midsize businesses, which tend to be more profitable customers than Fortune 1,000 corporations that can raise money from many sources. And Wells relentlessly cross-sells everything, including credit cards and mortgages (to consumers) and treasury-management services and insurance (to businesses). Wells persuades each retail customer to buy an average of almost six products, roughly twice the level of a decade ago. Business customers average almost eight products per customer.”

Wells Fargo has rightly been criticized for the practice, and its CEO has been dragged before a Congressional committee.  Customers, government regulators and members of the public have understandably been outraged.

But whenever a big corporate scandal hits the news, you guarantee there will be an abundance of knee-jerk, overreactions.

Media coverage has cast a negative light on cross-selling and the existence of sales-oriented corporate cultures. However, bad behavior in one company does not necessarily mean that cross-selling and “having a sales culture” are bad things.

I had lunch yesterday with the owner of a mid-sized manufacturing company.  We were talking about how he could increase his sales but then pointedly said, “I don’t want us to have a sales culture at our company where we end up cross-selling like Wells Fargo!”

Uh oh…I’m afraid cross-selling is getting an undeserved bad name. I respect the business owner’s strong desire to maintain an ethical company, but is he jumping too far too soon?

Is cross-selling really all that bad?

No.

Companies need sales cultures where employees are incentivized to sell more. Companies need to cross-sell in order to maximize revenue and deliver the best products/services to customers.

Companies are selling organizations, period. Your company may manufacture a certain product, may deliver a certain service or may develop new intellectual thinking, but none of that matters if you don’t sell it.  What’s more, if a given product at your company is perfect for a given client, there’s a good chance that one of your complementary products may also be of value.

A sales-oriented culture is necessary to stay in business.

How do you know if your sales culture is okay?

The best way to avoid a sales scandal and treat customers ethically is to focus on customer value. The key is to determine exactly what your customers truly care about and then do an outstanding job of delivering it.

Meanwhile, communicate accurately, honestly and promptly with your clients.  If you are only selling what customers value and making sure they are well informed and constantly kept in the loop, you can be proud of your sales culture.

As long as you are the trusted adviser, the person who puts clients’ needs before your own, there will be plenty of opportunities to cross-sell thus making both you and the client very happy.

There’s a big difference between opening fake accounts, the existence of which customers knew nothing, and having a company culture that simply maximizes the ways you can engage a customer.

Jeff Beals shows you how to find better prospects, close more deals and capture greater market share.  Jeff is an international award-winning author, sought-after keynote speaker, and accomplished sales consultant. A frequent media guest, Jeff has been featured in Investor’s Business Daily, USA Today, Men’s Health, Chicago Tribune and The New York Times.”

Here’s Why Should You Choose Jeff Beals as Your Next Speaker:

“Jeff is sure to deliver an engaging and motivating speech! He cleverly ties together his stories and makes the speech end with a punch. Being the closing speaker is tough, but he stepped-up to the challenge and hit a home-run. Due to the high ratings and overwhelming response to re-watch his speech, we are planning on using his video during our NextGen watch party.”  – Megan Dotson, Senior Client Success Consultant & Event Director, GovLoop.com, Washington, DC

“Your workshop was a huge experience for our attendees by giving them the opportunity to improve their work in the critical environment in which we are living today. Your talent as a speaker and your qualities as a person made the difference during your time with us. I would certainly recommend you to anyone who asks.” – Ana Paula Costa, Educational Planner, Febracorp, Sao Paulo, Brazil

“Our corporate partnership team had great takeaways regarding how to network smarter while also understanding the importance of our personal brand to current and prospective partners. Jeff does a great job weaving in real-world examples and how you can apply his teachings to growing your business and
building long-term partnerships.” – Jason Booker, Senior Director of Corporate Sponsorships, The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball Team

“If you are considering hiring Jeff, I will only say this: do it now. His ability to connect with an audience and explain the importance of telling the story is nothing short of extraordinary. The true litmus of any great speaker is authenticity. And when authenticity is coupled with an incredibly high amount of energy, humor, and engagement – you get Jeff.  I would highly recommend him to anyone who needs a speaker attendees will talk about for a long time to come.” – Alison Cody, Executive Director, Manufacturers’ Agents Association for the Foodservice Industry, Atlanta, GA

“I’m in Phoenix and had breakfast earlier this morning with our semi-retired sales representative who is doing some continued work for us here.  He attended your sales meeting last week and told me that in 43 years of selling, you were the best he had ever heard.  Thanks for a great experience.” – Drew Vogel, President & CEO, Diamond Vogel Paints, Orange City, IA

+1-402-917-5730

info@jeffbeals.com

Do Storytellers Really Close More Deals?

By Jeff Beals

As a person who has long believed in the power of storytelling, a recent Wall Street Journal headline caught my attention: “Why Good Storytellers Are Happier in Life and in Love.”

In the article, writer Elizabeth Bernstein writes that since the dawn of language, people have shared stories with others to entertain, persuade, make sense of what happened to them and bond. Research shows that the way people construct their individual stories has a large impact on their physical and mental health. People who frame their personal narratives in a positive way have more life satisfaction.

But it gets even better – good storytellers are considered more attractive. Bernstein mentions three studies in which women rated men who were good storytellers as more attractive and more desirable as long-term partners.

Storytelling is not just good for your social life; it can boost your sales effectiveness as well.

Stories pack a punch. They’re powerful. They paint pictures. They work, because our human brains are conditioned to listen to and be receptive to stories. Long before the written word, and long before Gutenberg invented the printing press, people used stories to communicate histories and traditions as well as norms and expectations. Our ancestors sat around the fire every night and told stories. The propensity to tell and listen to stories is essentially a part of our DNA.

So, if people are so receptive to storytelling, you and I would be foolish not to use stories in our sales work. If you manage a sales team, teach your reps and motivate them by conveying important information through stories. When selling products and services, use a story to paint a picture in your prospect’s mind. By making the product or service part of a story, prospective clients mentally project themselves into the story. Once someone makes that kind of psychological commitment, they’re much more likely to buy.

Let’s say we asked the same prospective client to sit through two sales presentations for competing products. Both salespersons touched on features and benefits. Salesperson A was very straightforward and focused on delivering factual content. Salesperson B was accurate but explained the features and benefits using stories. A couple of the stories were about previous clients who enjoyed positive results from using the product. I guarantee the second salesperson has a higher likelihood of landing the client.

One of the most important skills in sales is the ability to overcome objections. Well, if you get an objection, tell a story to keep the deal alive. Are you ready to deliver your close? Make it more desirable by couching it inside a story. Has the process become mired? Advance it by telling a story.

As you make a commitment to including more stories in your daily work, keep a couple things in mind:

1. Stories must be relative to the situation at hand.

2. Know when to shut up. If a story goes on too long, it loses its effectiveness

3. Think about the work you do and determine what kinds of stories could be effective in certain situations.

4. Catalog stories in your mind. Look back on your own experiences as well as the experiences of your colleagues. Make a list of stories to have at your disposal, so you can use them whenever it’s expedient.

Every product, service, business and individual sales professional has a story, probably multiple stories. The trick is to pull out these stories and use them to your benefit at the appropriate times. After all, if storytelling can make you appear more attractive and desirable at a party, you would be wise to use stories to build relationships with clients and close more deals.

Jeff Beals shows you how to find better prospects, close more deals and capture greater market share.  Jeff is an international award-winning author, sought-after keynote speaker, and accomplished sales consultant. A frequent media guest, Jeff has been featured in Investor’s Business Daily, USA Today, Men’s Health, Chicago Tribune and The New York Times.”

Here’s Why Should You Choose Jeff Beals as Your Next Speaker:

“Jeff is sure to deliver an engaging and motivating speech! He cleverly ties together his stories and makes the speech end with a punch. Being the closing speaker is tough, but he stepped-up to the challenge and hit a home-run. Due to the high ratings and overwhelming response to re-watch his speech, we are planning on using his video during our NextGen watch party.”  – Megan Dotson, Senior Client Success Consultant & Event Director, GovLoop.com, Washington, DC

“Your workshop was a huge experience for our attendees by giving them the opportunity to improve their work in the critical environment in which we are living today. Your talent as a speaker and your qualities as a person made the difference during your time with us. I would certainly recommend you to anyone who asks.” – Ana Paula Costa, Educational Planner, Febracorp, Sao Paulo, Brazil

“Our corporate partnership team had great takeaways regarding how to network smarter while also understanding the importance of our personal brand to current and prospective partners. Jeff does a great job weaving in real-world examples and how you can apply his teachings to growing your business and
building long-term partnerships.” – Jason Booker, Senior Director of Corporate Sponsorships, The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball Team

“If you are considering hiring Jeff, I will only say this: do it now. His ability to connect with an audience and explain the importance of telling the story is nothing short of extraordinary. The true litmus of any great speaker is authenticity. And when authenticity is coupled with an incredibly high amount of energy, humor, and engagement – you get Jeff.  I would highly recommend him to anyone who needs a speaker attendees will talk about for a long time to come.” – Alison Cody, Executive Director, Manufacturers’ Agents Association for the Foodservice Industry, Atlanta, GA

“I’m in Phoenix and had breakfast earlier this morning with our semi-retired sales representative who is doing some continued work for us down here.  He attended your sales meeting last week and told me that in 43 years of selling, you were the best he had heard.  Thanks for a great experience.” – Drew Vogel, President & CEO, Diamond Vogel Paints, Orange City, IA

+1-402-917-5730

info@jeffbeals.com

Three Causes of Unethical Behavior at Work

By Jeff Beals

I remember sitting through a discussion session about a year ago at a real estate conference.  I presented earlier in the day and then stuck around to participate in the rest of the program.

The topic of business ethics came up and attendees all agreed that companies and individual professionals should always strive to behave ethically.  Then one of the participants made the argument that placing a major emphasis on ethics actually makes a company more profitable.

Several heads nodded in agreement, but a guy sitting near me rolled his eyes and spoke up: “That might be the case in the markets where some of you live, but that’s not the case in Chicago and New York.”  He went on to say that sophisticated real estate investors in those fast-moving markets are not receptive to talk about ethics, because it’s a “soft topic,” something that doesn’t resonate with serious real estate professionals.

This cynical fellow was well dressed, clear spoken and possessed of confidence, which caused some of the participants to nod in agreement, but to this day, his assertion remains one of the most ridiculous things I have ever heard.  It was also an insult to the millions of ethical professionals working in Chicago and New York!

Regardless of how sharply you focus on hard results, putting an emphasis on ethical behavior and ethical decision-making always pays off in the long run. No doubt there are times when taking the ethical road causes a short-term loss. But over the course of many years, those professionals and companies that build an ethical reputation will be particularly adept at attracting and retaining clients (thereby increasing profits).  Nobody is perfect, and no organization does everything right every time, but a commitment to ethics positively changes culture in the end.

I think some “serious” business professionals don’t want to talk about ethics because they don’t want to contemplate their own unethical behavior. Contrary to what some hotshots might think, ethics-in-business is NOT a soft topic.

As researchers dig deeper into the effect of ethics on outcomes, we are learning that everything in a business (or any other organization) is interconnected.

The Business Ethics Alliance, a program affiliated with Creighton University, recently highlighted research from the Journal of Business Ethics, which suggested that stressful situations at work may lead decision makers to act unethically.

Researchers surveyed employees from a multinational engineering company. Participants completed questionnaires that asked about different sources of stress in the workplace. Participants also described how they would react to certain ethical dilemmas.

What was the end result? Out of multiple sources of stress, three were associated with stronger intentions to engage in unethical behavior:

  1. A Lack of Rewards – Regardless of the whether the lack of rewards is real or perceived, it may lead decision makers to compensate themselves in unethical ways.
  1. Poor Team Work – Frustration over poor team work may result in unethical actions toward other team members or the organization as a whole.
  1. Lack of Information – When employees don’t have adequate information, their ability to even perceive an ethical dilemma is impaired.

Interestingly, the other forms of stress studied but not particularly prone to impair ethical decision-making were powerlessness, ambiguity, overload, boredom, lack of feedback, punishment and alienation.

The Business Ethics Alliance recommends organizational leaders remember that rewards can be non-materialistic, such as positive feedback. Leaders should minimize these sources of stress in order to maximize ethical decision-making potential.

We may never see the day when each of us behaves ethically one-hundred percent of the time, but a conscientious commitment to ethics will eventually make a better world and a better place for us to live and work.

Jeff Beals shows you how to find better prospects, close more deals and capture greater market share.  Jeff is an international award-winning author, sought-after keynote speaker, and accomplished sales consultant. A frequent media guest, Jeff has been featured in Investor’s Business Daily, USA Today, Men’s Health, Chicago Tribune and The New York Times.”

Here’s Why Should You Choose Jeff Beals as Your Next Speaker:

“Jeff is sure to deliver an engaging and motivating speech! He cleverly ties together his stories and makes the speech end with a punch. Being the closing speaker is tough, but he stepped-up to the challenge and hit a home-run. Due to the high ratings and overwhelming response to re-watch his speech, we are planning on using his video during our NextGen watch party.”  – Megan Dotson, Senior Client Success Consultant & Event Director, GovLoop.com, Washington, DC

“Your workshop was a huge experience for our attendees by giving them the opportunity to improve their work in the critical environment in which we are living today. Your talent as a speaker and your qualities as a person made the difference during your time with us. I would certainly recommend you to anyone who asks.” – Ana Paula Costa, Educational Planner, Febracorp, Sao Paulo, Brazil

“Our corporate partnership team had great takeaways regarding how to network smarter while also understanding the importance of our personal brand to current and prospective partners. Jeff does a great job weaving in real-world examples and how you can apply his teachings to growing your business and
building long-term partnerships.” – Jason Booker, Senior Director of Corporate Sponsorships, The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball Team

“If you are considering hiring Jeff, I will only say this: do it now. His ability to connect with an audience and explain the importance of telling the story is nothing short of extraordinary. The true litmus of any great speaker is authenticity. And when authenticity is coupled with an incredibly high amount of energy, humor, and engagement – you get Jeff.  I would highly recommend him to anyone who needs a speaker attendees will talk about for a long time to come.” – Alison Cody, Executive Director, Manufacturers’ Agents Association for the Foodservice Industry, Atlanta, GA

“I’m in Phoenix and had breakfast earlier this morning with our semi-retired sales representative who is doing some continued work for us down here.  He attended your sales meeting last week and told me that in 43 years of selling, you were the best he had heard.  Thanks for a great experience.” – Drew Vogel, President & CEO, Diamond Vogel Paints, Orange City, IA

+1-402-917-5730

info@jeffbeals.com