Tag Archives: leader

Would You Benefit by Having a Coach?

By Jeff Beals

What do Tom Brady, Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods and Wayne Gretzky have in common?

They’re all world-class athletes who have won championships?  Yes.

They’re all incredibly famous?  Yes.

But there’s something else they all have in common.  Each had coaches who helped them reach the pinnacle of their sports.

Not only do athletes benefit from coaching, they probably would never win a championship without it.  Well, if coaching is so advantageous for professional athletes, it makes sense that other professionals would gain similar benefits from coaching.

I would argue that sales professionals benefit more from coaching than your typical professional.  Sales is not necessarily rocket science, but it does require you to master an array of differing skills and attitudes.

Mindset is incredibly important in sales, because the profession requires you to be passionate.  An accountant, for instance, can be bored to tears yet still do an effective job.  In many professions, you can hate your job, and even be turned off by the products your company sells, and still manage to be effective.

That’s not the case in sales where it makes a big difference when you’re excited about the product and a believer in the company.  But sometimes even passionate sales reps become discouraged when things go wrong: you hit a prospecting slump; the economy goes south or deals fall through at the last minute unexpectedly.  A coach can help you with mindset, keeping your energy and enthusiasm flowing when things don’t go your way.

Sales also requires a person to master somewhat dichotomous skills.  You need to be both an attentive listener and compelling presenter.  You need to have strong emotional intelligence skills yet be analytical when determining the profitability of a potential deal.

Should you have a coach?  That’s a personal decision, but the research tells us that those sales professionals who have access to coaching enjoy more success.  And that applies to sales professionals of all levels – from chief sales officer to entry-level sales rep.

Coaches come in a variety of forms, but most are informal coaches.  The typical way to get a coach is to find someone in your company who can advise you and help you grow as a professional.  That can be a boss, an experienced colleague who wants to give back or even a person from a different department or company who enjoys helping people succeed.  Some sales pros will work with a retired sales leader they happen to know.

Of course, you can also hire professional sales coaches.  There are many companies that provide this service.  If you go that route, ask around and find someone who has had a good experience with a sales coach and feels like they got a lot of value for their money.

What do you look for in a coach?  First and foremost, you want a good listener.  You want to find a person who wants to see you succeed but won’t just simply give you all the answers.  A good sales coach will do some teaching and advice sharing but mostly helps you come to your own conclusions about how to build a more successful career.

I recommend you share your goals with your coach and use those as part of your conversations.  Great athletes have goals they’re trying to achieve.  Along with their coaches, those athletes constantly monitor the progress they’re making and push themselves to greater heights.

Jeff Beals shows you how to find better prospects, close more deals and capture greater market share.  Jeff is an international award-winning author, sought-after keynote speaker, and accomplished sales consultant. A frequent media guest, Jeff has been featured in Investor’s Business Daily, USA Today, Men’s Health, Chicago Tribune and The New York Times.”

Here’s Why Should You Choose Jeff Beals as Your Next Speaker:

“Jeff Beals has presented four different topics at five of our internal events this year. At each event, the audience of commercial real estate principals and agents was completely engaged and motivated the entire time. Jeff facilitates his training sessions in such a way that each member of the audience was able to relate and understand how to apply it every day in the field. Jeff is brilliant, and we have hired him to continue speaking at our events next year!” – Lindsay Fierro, Senior Vice President, NAI Global, New York, NY

I’m in Phoenix and had breakfast earlier this morning with our semi-retired sales representative who is doing some continued work for us here.  He attended your sales meeting last week and told me that in 43 years of selling, you were the best he had ever heard.  Thanks for a great experience.” – Drew Vogel, President & CEO, Diamond Vogel Paints, Orange City, IA

“Our corporate partnership team had great takeaways regarding how to network smarter while also understanding the importance of our personal brand to current and prospective partners. Jeff does a great job weaving in real-world examples and how you can apply his teachings to growing your business and building long-term partnerships.” – Jason Booker, Senior Director of Corporate Sponsorships, The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball Team

+1-402-637-9300

info@jeffbeals.com

How Can You Be More Entrepreneurial in Your Work?

By Jeff Beals

Somewhere between 5-to-10 percent of the population is entrepreneurial.

But what does that really mean?  Do you have to own a business to be entrepreneurial?  Absolutely not. In fact, there are a number of entrepreneurs who frankly are not very entrepreneurial.

In the United States, about 13 percent of adults own some sort of business.  Yet not all those people have truly entrepreneurial personalities.  Think about it…Half of all business owners fail within the first five years of operation.  Even among business owners who succeed, a decent-sized percentage are unhappy. One reason for their misery could be incongruence – perhaps they are non-entrepreneurial people working as entrepreneurs.

Just as some entrepreneurs aren’t terribly entrepreneurial, some traditional employees do have entrepreneurial personalities.

No matter what professional role you play in life, you can be more successful if you incorporate some level of entrepreneurial thinking and behavior into your work. In that spirit, here are some entrepreneurial characteristics you may want to make part of your professional life:

Moderate Risk-Taking – Stereotypically, entrepreneurs have a reputation for taking big risks. That’s not really accurate. Big risks have a low likelihood of panning out. Successful entrepreneurs are moderate risk takers. They don’t shy away from ambiguity if they believe opportunity is present, but they study and calculate before taking the risk.

If you work as an employee in an office setting, the same approach to risk-taking may help you. If you don’t take any risks, you may never get ahead or you may be subjected to a career of perpetual boredom. If you take calculated risks, you’re more likely to advance and enjoy your work.

Tolerance of Uncertainty – Entrepreneurial people don’t have excessive fear of failure. Any fear they do have, they use as motivation to keep working hard. Similarly, they don’t crave security. They can handle living with the unknown. That’s a particularly valuable characteristic, because even traditional jobs are riddled with uncertainty these days. When entrepreneurs do fail, they don’t let it ruin their lives. Instead, they see each setback as a learning experience.

Ego – Entrepreneurial people are somewhat egotistical. Obviously, you don’t want to be an obnoxious ass, but if you’re lacking in confidence, you should work on it. Entrepreneurs ultimately believe they will be successful. They believe hard work is an investment. They use their sense of ego as a driving motivator. It’s one of the things that keeps them focused and working hard even when they feel tired.  Entrepreneurs have a “social” ego as well in that they build relationships and enjoy having positive reputations. Even if you’re an introvert, constantly develop and refine your people skills, because working with and through others is critically important.

High Energy – It takes a lot of energy to power entrepreneurial efforts. That’s why entrepreneurial people are full of oomph.  If your energy level is not high enough, try changing your nutrition, sleep and exercise habits. Energetic people attract more attention and create more excitement. Similar to energy is perseverance. When things aren’t going well, entrepreneurial people double down and push harder.

Goal-Oriented – This might be the most important entrepreneurial characteristic. The more likely you are to set goals, monitor those goals and be driven by them, the more likely you are to reach the highest heights in your career.

Two Views on the World – Entrepreneurial people are diverse thinkers. They can simultaneously manage tactics while thinking strategically. They can work on short-term and long-term goals at the same time.

Integrity – This might come as a surprise to some people who think of entrepreneurs as ruthless, selfish types, however, the most consistently successful entrepreneurs exhibit high levels of integrity. No, they’re not saints, but they are generally ethical and care about other people. The longer people and organization exhibit consistent integrity, the more likely they will succeed.

So, what can you do to be more entrepreneurial in your work?  How can it benefit you?

An entrepreneur is not some super-human creature. An entrepreneur isn’t necessarily a business owner. Instead, an entrepreneur is someone who takes “ownership” of their life/job and uses the above characteristics as a pathway to success.

Jeff Beals shows you how to find better prospects, close more deals and capture greater market share.  Jeff is an international award-winning author, sought-after keynote speaker, and accomplished sales consultant. A frequent media guest, Jeff has been featured in Investor’s Business Daily, USA Today, Men’s Health, Chicago Tribune and The New York Times.”

Here’s Why Should You Choose Jeff Beals as Your Next Speaker:

“Jeff Beals has presented four different topics at five of our internal events in 2016. At each event, the audience of commercial real estate principals and agents was completely engaged and motivated the entire time. Jeff facilitates his training sessions in such a way that each member of the audience was able to relate and understand how to apply it every day in the field. Jeff is brilliant, and we have hired him to continue speaking at our events in 2017!” – Lindsay Fierro, Senior Vice President, NAI Global, New York, NY

“Your workshop was a huge experience for our attendees by giving them the opportunity to improve their work in the critical environment in which we are living today. Your talent as a speaker and your qualities as a person made the difference during your time with us. I would certainly recommend you to anyone who asks.” – Ana Paula Costa, Educational Planner, Febracorp, Sao Paulo, Brazil

I’m in Phoenix and had breakfast earlier this morning with our semi-retired sales representative who is doing some continued work for us here.  He attended your sales meeting last week and told me that in 43 years of selling, you were the best he had ever heard.  Thanks for a great experience.” – Drew Vogel, President & CEO, Diamond Vogel Paints, Orange City, IA

“Our corporate partnership team had great takeaways regarding how to network smarter while also understanding the importance of our personal brand to current and prospective partners. Jeff does a great job weaving in real-world examples and how you can apply his teachings to growing your business and building long-term partnerships.” – Jason Booker, Senior Director of Corporate Sponsorships, The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball Team

+1-402-917-5730

info@jeffbeals.com