Tag Archives: Personal Branding

Put Big Mama’s Picture on the Business Card

By Jeff Beals

AUTHOR’S NOTE: I originally published this article six years ago in March of 2012.  The star of the article, Patricia “Big Mama” Barron, passed away yesterday at age 76.  She was a bigger-than-life personality who made a positive difference in my hometown.  I enjoyed interviewing her and periodically chatting with her in the years since.  She was an amazing woman.  I hope you find the second release of this article interesting and enlightening…

When Patricia Barron first became a grandmother, she wasn’t ready to be called “grandma” or “granny.”  Such labels were way too old fashioned for her.  After all, she still felt young and had a lot of dreams left to pursue.

In some African-American families, the name “Big Mama” is affectionately used to describe a grandmother, but more than that, it’s a title of honor given to the family matriarch.  Such was the case in Barron’s family.  Once she became “Big Mama,” the name stuck, and there was no going back.

When you meet her today, it’s as if she has always been Big Mama. Everyone calls her that whether they’re related to her or not.  With her charming personality, welcoming nature and motherly persona, you immediately feel comfortable using such a friendly, informal title.

After a 30-year career working for the telephone company, Big Mama retired from Ma Bell and was ready to start the next chapter of her life.  It was time to pursue a lifelong dream: to be a restaurateur and owner of her own restaurant.

She developed a love of cooking as a little girl observing her grandmother prepare Sunday dinners.  In her early twenties, she studied culinary arts.  As her family grew, Big Mama loved preparing large meals for relatives and friends.  It wasn’t uncommon for 30 or 40 people to come over for dinner.  As she says, “I love to feed people.”

It only made sense that Big Mama would consider opening a restaurant upon her retirement. But she didn’t want to open just any restaurant.  She wanted to bring her grandmother’s old recipes to life – oven-fried chicken, collard greens, stir-fried cabbage and sweet potato pie.

What’s more, she wanted to open her business in economically challenged north Omaha, an urban, predominantly African-American quadrant of Omaha, Nebraska.  Big Mama hoped her restaurant would help breathe new life into the neighborhood and provide needed jobs for workers who could use a second chance.

While it was an exciting concept and a noble idea, it was not an easy sell to reluctant lenders, who had no confidence in funding a restaurant business in north Omaha.  Perhaps more surprising, lenders were hesitant, because Big Mama was 65 years old.  How long would she run the business?  Could they count on her staying healthy?

“I had experienced discrimination in my life, because I was black and because I was a woman,” Big Mama told me, “but I had never been discriminated against because I was old!”

Undeterred, she gathered her resources, relied on her faith and leaned on her network of friends/family to open Big Mama’s Kitchen on a youth services campus that was once a state school for deaf children.  It was hard work, but she did it.

Five years later, her restaurant is doing well.  She is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner six days a week.  Her famous sweet potato ice cream is now stocked on local grocery store shelves. At age 70, Big Mama is loving life as an entrepreneur and plans to keep feeding people until she’s 100.  She now makes a living doing what she loves, and at the same time, she’s doing her part to help rebuild a community that has experienced so much disappointment.

Right about now, you’re probably thinking this story feels good, but it’s actually about to get even better.

You see, Big Mama’s story is not just motivational, it’s highly instructive.  Big Mama offers many lessons for those who wish to succeed in business.

Regular readers of this column know that I believe in the power of personal branding and what it can do to build businesses and strengthen organizations.  When people who work inside an organization become “famous,” the whole organization benefits.

Big Mama’s Kitchen has great food and great service, but much of its success is due to the owner’s personality and the personal brand she has built.

Awhile back, she sought the counsel of a marketing firm.  It turned out to be money well spent, as the consultant gave her a great piece of advice: “Big Mama, put your picture on the restaurant’s logo. Put your picture on your business card.”

At first, the modest Big Mama wasn’t comfortable with the idea, but she eventually agreed to give it a try.

The new logo is brilliant.  For one thing, Big Mama believes it’s good for African-American customers to see her face.   They can see that an African-American woman is running a soul food restaurant.  But a very large percentage of her customers are white, and most of them drive many miles to dine in her restaurant.  Her image resonates with those white customers too.  She is the personification of a “Big Mama.”  She is the face of her business.

Big Mama’s personal branding efforts are paying off as she has become a celebrity.  She is the local queen of soul food. Her restaurant has been featured on The Food Channel, The Travel Channel and the Sundance Channel.  People have been known to board an airplane, fly into town, eat at Big Mama’s and fly home the same day.  Her spicy “Afro Burger” was front-and-center on the popular television show Diners, Drive-ins & Dives.

People who visit the restaurant come for the food, but you can see it on their faces when they walk in – they look around the room hoping to catch a glimpse of Big Mama, the woman who embodies the restaurant.

Granted, if the food and service weren’t great, the restaurant wouldn’t still be here.  But quality alone is often not enough.  There’s so much competition in this world.  There are so many ways a business can fail.  By building a personal brand and attaching it to your company, you benefit.  Everyone benefits.  People are the portals of profit.  We are much more comfortable doing business with someone than something.

Like Big Mama, your widely recognized and highly respected personal brand can set you apart from your competitors.

Jeff Beals shows you how to find better prospects, close more deals and capture greater market share.  Jeff is an international award-winning author, sought-after keynote speaker, and accomplished sales consultant. A frequent media guest, Jeff has been featured in Investor’s Business Daily, USA Today, Men’s Health, Chicago Tribune and The New York Times.”

Here’s Why Should You Choose Jeff Beals as Your Next Speaker:

“Jeff Beals has presented four different topics at five of our internal events this year. At each event, the audience of commercial real estate principals and agents was completely engaged and motivated the entire time. Jeff facilitates his training sessions in such a way that each member of the audience was able to relate and understand how to apply it every day in the field. Jeff is brilliant, and we have hired him to continue speaking at our events next year!” – Lindsay Fierro, Senior Vice President, NAI Global, New York, NY

I’m in Phoenix and had breakfast earlier this morning with our semi-retired sales representative who is doing some continued work for us here.  He attended your sales meeting last week and told me that in 43 years of selling, you were the best he had ever heard.  Thanks for a great experience.” – Drew Vogel, President & CEO, Diamond Vogel Paints, Orange City, IA

“Our corporate partnership team had great takeaways regarding how to network smarter while also understanding the importance of our personal brand to current and prospective partners. Jeff does a great job weaving in real-world examples and how you can apply his teachings to growing your business and building long-term partnerships.” – Jason Booker, Senior Director of Corporate Sponsorships, The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball Team

+1-402-637-9300

info@jeffbeals.com

Finding Your Own Area of Self Marketing Expertise

By Jeff Beals

“You’re in real estate; you’ll know,” my friend said with an inquisitive look on his face. “What company is moving into that big office building under construction along the freeway?”

This was a problematic question for me, because I hadn’t even noticed the office building under construction along the freeway.

It was back in 2001, and I had just left a position in college administration for a brand-new career in commercial real estate. After two weeks on the job, I went to a party where three separate people asked me questions about office buildings, retailers and condominium construction. I must have sounded pretty stupid, because I had trouble answering all of them.

I had spent my first two weeks on the job diligently learning about the legal and technical aspects of real estate. But at the party, nobody wanted to know the boring stuff. They wanted to talk about the prestigious, glamorous side of the industry.

Something suddenly became quite clear: It wasn’t enough to become technically proficient in my new trade. I had to become an expert on those things related to commercial real estate that were most fascinating to people outside the profession.

I made a commitment to become an expert on the most interesting aspects. I studied the local marketplace. I read every magazine, newspaper and website I could find that related to construction, real estate, business expansion and economic development.

Armed with a collection of eyebrow-raising stats and trivia, I had something to talk about at social gatherings. Community groups requested me as a luncheon speaker, and with a business partner, I even started an business-oriented radio talk show. All of this public exposure was good for business.

I did not realize it at the time, but I accidentally discovered an “area of self marketing expertise.” Everyone is an expert in his or her profession, but an area of self marketing expertise is quite different. It consists of the most fascinating aspects of your job, company or industry.

An area of self marketing expertise is that part of what you do that is most fascinating to someone who doesn’t do what you do.

So, what’s your area of self marketing expertise?

No matter how boring or complicated you might think your work is, something about it is fascinating to outsiders.

If you’re not sure, sit down with a few friends and explain what you do. Ask them what they find most interesting. Take notes.

Once you have decided on your area of self marketing expertise, think about how you will communicate it in an intriguing way. When that’s mastered, it’s time to put your area of self marketing expertise to work for you. Use it at networking events, in your organization’s communication efforts, when dealing with media outlets and in your social media postings.

Professionals who have well defined and carefully crafted areas of self marketing expertise will ultimately be more successful, because they never run out of interesting things to talk about. An area of self marketing expertise becomes a magnet, attracting people to you.

When people are dazzled by what you have to say, they’ll be more than happy to hire you when they need help with the more technical and “boring” aspects of your profession (the things that actually make money for you)!

An area of self marketing expertise gets you noticed and makes you memorable.

Jeff Beals shows you how to find better prospects, close more deals and capture greater market share.  Jeff is an international award-winning author, sought-after keynote speaker, and accomplished sales consultant. A frequent media guest, Jeff has been featured in Investor’s Business Daily, USA Today, Men’s Health, Chicago Tribune and The New York Times.”

Here’s Why Should You Choose Jeff Beals as Your Next Speaker:

“Jeff Beals has presented four different topics at five of our internal events in 2016. At each event, the audience of commercial real estate principals and agents was completely engaged and motivated the entire time. Jeff facilitates his training sessions in such a way that each member of the audience was able to relate and understand how to apply it every day in the field. Jeff is brilliant, and we have hired him to continue speaking at our events in 2017!” – Lindsay Fierro, Senior Vice President, NAI Global, New York, NY

“Your workshop was a huge experience for our attendees by giving them the opportunity to improve their work in the critical environment in which we are living today. Your talent as a speaker and your qualities as a person made the difference during your time with us. I would certainly recommend you to anyone who asks.” – Ana Paula Costa, Educational Planner, Febracorp, Sao Paulo, Brazil

I’m in Phoenix and had breakfast earlier this morning with our semi-retired sales representative who is doing some continued work for us here.  He attended your sales meeting last week and told me that in 43 years of selling, you were the best he had ever heard.  Thanks for a great experience.” – Drew Vogel, President & CEO, Diamond Vogel Paints, Orange City, IA

“Our corporate partnership team had great takeaways regarding how to network smarter while also understanding the importance of our personal brand to current and prospective partners. Jeff does a great job weaving in real-world examples and how you can apply his teachings to growing your business and building long-term partnerships.” – Jason Booker, Senior Director of Corporate Sponsorships, The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball Team

+1-402-917-5730

info@jeffbeals.com

The Top 12 Personal Branding Essentials for Sales Professionals

By Jeff Beals

In order to be an effective salesperson or savvy marketer, you must understand the value of personal branding and how to make it a part of your work.  When it comes to personal branding, keep these 12 key points in mind:

1. Regardless of what you sell, everything is easier when you have a great personal brand.

2. If you have a widely recognized and highly respected personal brand, your voicemails and emails are more likely to be returned.

3. All sales professionals should seek to become celebrities in their own spheres of interest.

4. Excellence is not enough. In a competitive marketplace, talent and hard work are simply expected.

5. You are not just a human being. You are an entity, a business of one, a business unto yourself.

6. You are in a lifelong series of “campaigns” trying to be “elected” to whatever matters to you. That’s why you should think like a politician.

7. Live actively and focus externally. In order to become a celebrity in your sphere of interest, you need to be seemingly “everywhere.”

8. Develop an area of self-marketing expertise, something related to what you do but is fascinating to people who do not do what you do. This is what you talk about when you network.

9. Don’t network just for the sake of networking. Focus on results.

10. Put on a show. Don’t be someone you are not, but play up your strengths and put forth your best image possible.

11. While you are portraying yourself in a positive light, do keep it real. Your prospects can sense authenticity as well as a lack of it.

12. Never go back on any promise made to any prospective client during a networking encounter.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker, award-winning author and sales consultant, who helps companies increase their profits and associations achieve their missions through effective sales and personal branding techniques.

Here’s Why Should You Choose Jeff Beals as Your Next Speaker:

“Jeff is sure to deliver an engaging and motivating speech! He cleverly ties together his stories and makes the speech end with a punch. Being the closing speaker is tough, but he stepped-up to the challenge and hit a home-run. Due to the high ratings and overwhelming response to re-watch his speech, we are planning on using his video during our NextGen watch party.”  – Megan Dotson, Senior Client Success Consultant & Event Director, GovLoop.com, Washington, DC

“Your workshop was a huge experience for our attendees by giving them the opportunity to improve their work in the critical environment in which we are living today. Your talent as a speaker and your qualities as a person made the difference during your time with us. I would certainly recommend you to anyone who asks.” – Ana Paula Costa, Educational Planner, Febracorp, Sao Paulo, Brazil

“Our corporate partnership team had great takeaways regarding how to network smarter while also understanding the importance of our personal brand to current and prospective partners. Jeff does a great job weaving in real-world examples and how you can apply his teachings to growing your business and
building long-term partnerships.” – Jason Booker, Senior Director of Corporate Sponsorships, The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball Team

“If you are considering hiring Jeff, I will only say this: do it now. His ability to connect with an audience and explain the importance of telling the story is nothing short of extraordinary. The true litmus of any great speaker is authenticity. And when authenticity is coupled with an incredibly high amount of energy, humor, and engagement – you get Jeff.  I would highly recommend him to anyone who needs a speaker attendees will talk about for a long time to come.” – Alison Cody, Executive Director, Manufacturers’ Agents Association for the Foodservice Industry, Atlanta, GA

“I’m in Phoenix and had breakfast earlier this morning with our semi-retired sales representative who is doing some continued work for us down here.  He attended your sales meeting last week and told me that in 43 years of selling, you were the best he had heard.  Thanks for a great experience.” – Drew Vogel, President & CEO, Diamond Vogel Paints, Orange City, IA

+1-402-917-5730

info@jeffbeals.com

Get Serious about Your Personal Brand in 2016

By Jeff Beals

The beginning of the year is a perfect time to assess your personal brand status and make plans to grow and strengthen the image people have of you.

Make no mistake…You ARE a brand. You’re a business of one, a business unto yourself. Every successful business makes annual marketing goals. As a “personal business,” so too must you. So too must all of us.

Whether you want more/bigger clients or a better career opportunity, make a commitment to market yourself in 2016.

To get you started, here are 12 items to consider:

Focus externally – Be active and involved outside your home or office. Show up at networking events. Go out of your way to talk to people when you are in public venues. Remember that nearly 75% of all jobs are never advertised and a similar percentage of big clients only come from relationship-building. Make it a goal to attend a certain number of events per month.

Think Like a Sales Pro – Because you are a “business” of one, you need to sell yourself the way businesses sell themselves. Read up on marketing and sales techniques. Remember that a good sales rep always has lots of prospects moving through all parts of his or her pipeline at all times. In other words, at any given time, you should be meeting new people, strengthening relationships with existing acquaintances and holding serious professional conversations (deal-making, so to speak) with people you know well.

Find the Fascinating – You need an “area of self-marketing expertise,” something about your business or career that is fascinating to people outside your profession. Feature this when you are networking or using social media.

Focus on results when networking – Determine what is most interesting about your career and your line of work and then exploit it. I call it your “area of self marketing expertise.” That’s what you talk about when you meet new people, not the mundane, technical details that will cause a lay person’s eyes to glaze over in boredom.

Build a “Google trail” – If you haven’t done a search on your name lately, see what’s out there. I guarantee that people are Googling you on a regular basis. A prospective client will probably Google you to know who he or she is dealing with before meeting with you. That’s why a Google trail is so important. If nothing or very little pops up when someone Googles you, there’s a problem – they’ll assume you don’t have much going on. Therefore, Google your own name on a regular basis. If you’re not very visible on line, deliberately get your name out there to build an Internet presence.

Get serious about social media – Be honest…Is your online brand inadequate? Social media are now to people what the Yellow Pages were to businesses 25 years ago – THE place where future clients and prospective employers find out about you. Don’t just have a presence on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. Make sure you post material that is interesting and not just inane personal stuff. Use social media to strengthen your reputation by building on your area of self-marketing expertise. Social meeting is not just for fun; it’s an essential business tool.

Go Beyond the Big Three – LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook are great, but don’t stop there. The more social media outlets you use, the better. Google+ is growing in importance. You can even use Pinterest and Instagram to build a personal brand. Some professionals have received great benefit from placing short videos on YouTube. Blogging has long been a powerful personal branding tool.

Use Your Real Name – In order to build your personal brand awareness, use your real name when reviewing products on websites, making comments at the end of newspaper/magazine articles and posting comments on discussion forums. Just make sure the things you write help your personal brand as opposed to harming it.

Engage the Media – Volunteer your expertise to media outlets in your industry as well as your local market. Make a point to meet members of your local and industry media and build friendly relationships with them. In addition to traditional media, you can get a lot of mileage from doing blogs and podcasts.

Refresh your value statement – Does your 20-second intro speech need updating? You need to be able to say what you do quickly, clearly and in a way that captures a person’s interest. A useful elevator speech also conveys how a person could benefit from what you do.

Ask probing questions – Don’t just chit-chat and make small talk during networking conversations. Ask some questions designed to uncover the critical information that leads to new opportunities.

Listen to your clients and colleagues – When we get too busy, it’s easy to start making assumptions. Those assumptions can cause you to lose opportunities. Instead, ask the important questions and truly listen to the responses. Don’t just go through the motions. Let the other person’s words sink in and make an impression on your brain.

By the way, never let up. When things are good, don’t let complacency stop you from perpetually marketing yourself. When things are going poorly, don’t let discouragement be an excuse for apathy.

Remember, marketing yourself is never about ego; it’s just marketing. In a loud and crowded world, hard work and talent are no longer enough. You need to make sure key audiences know about your abilities and accomplishments.

At the dawn of a New Year, as it is all year long, destiny is in your hands.

May 2016 bring you unprecedented prosperity.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker, sales consultant and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

FREE eBOOK: Would You Like To Profit From the Networking Events You Attend?

Everyone knows you need to network in order to find new clients or land a new job, yet most people don’t do a very good job of it.  Why? Because they don’t network with a purpose. Don’t fall behind the competition!  “Goal-Based Networking,” a brand-new, free eBook, will help you turn networking into new business or professional opportunities.

What do you get?  23 quick-reading pages with networking and prospecting advice you can implement today. This eBook will make networking both enjoyable and profitable for you!

Download the “Goal-Based Networking” eBook Now >>

Sell Yourself the Way a Salesperson Sells

By Jeff Beals

Sales professionals talk about their “funnels” or their “pipelines” when discussing prospective clients and where those prospects are in the buying process.

Picture a big funnel like something you would use to pour oil into an engine. Instead of serving as a conduit for liquid, however, the sales funnel is a conduit for turning prospects into clients.

At the top of the funnel would be all the prospects that exist. As you go down the funnel, the opening narrows, meaning there is less space for prospects. Each step in the sales process requires you to go farther down into a narrower funnel. At the very bottom, only a few prospects drip out. Those “drips” represent the prospects who actually become clients.

When promoting your personal brand, you want to keep the funnel analogy in mind.

Let’s say you’re interested in a new job

In the job-search funnel, you have all possible employers at the top.  A little ways down, you have the employers you actually meet. Next are the employers who actually receive your resume. Those with whom you interview are farther down the funnel. At the very bottom of the funnel would the employer who actually offers you the job you end up accepting.

Let’s say you’re interested in new clients

In the client-acquisition funnel, you have all prospective clients at the top. Other steps moving down from the top to the narrower parts would include those who hear about you, those who call you, those you meet in person, and those you engage in serious negotiation. Finally, the clients who actually sign contracts with you are represent the drops falling out of the funnel’s base.

When dealing with a funnel, you are working on people at every stage of the buying process. You should devote more time per prospect to those who are farther down. When you meet a new prospect, a “top-of-funnel person,” don’t worry about turning her into a closed deal right away. If you meet a potential employer, don’t expect to jump to a job offer right away. Your goal with any person in a funnel should be to advance him or her to the next step. Don’t worry about the end; just focus on pushing each person one step deeper into the funnel.

Fill the hopper

While you have to spend more time per person on prospects near the funnel’s bottom, you can’t forget the top. Some sales people focus so heavily on closing deals that months go by in which they don’t do any new prospecting. When their current deals either close or die, there’s nothing new. If a job seeker spends all his time focusing on one potential job, he can be left out in the cold if the job falls through and no other prospects are in his funnel. You must constantly fill the hopper.

Personal Brand Funnel

So how does the funnel relate to personal branding (or building a bigger name and reputation for yourself)?

Keep in mind that you are not just a person. You’re an entity, a brand, a business of one, a business unto yourself. The more people who have heard your name and have a positive feeling associated with your name, the more opportunities – both personal and professional – you will receive. Just as a business markets itself perpetually so must you.

People do business with other people. Regardless of what you do for a living, it’s in your best interest to never stop “prospecting,” meaning you are constantly looking to meet new people. Once you meet them, slowly push them through your personal funnel until they eventually become close relationships with whom you can share mutually beneficial opportunities.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker, sales consultant and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

FREE eBOOK: Would You Like To Profit From the Networking Events You Attend?

Everyone knows you need to network in order to find new clients or land a new job, yet most people don’t do a very good job of it.  Why? Because they don’t network with a purpose. Don’t fall behind the competition!  “Goal-Based Networking,” a brand-new, free eBook, will help you turn networking into new business or professional opportunities.  What do you get?  23 quick-reading pages with networking and prospecting advice you can implement today. This eBook will make networking both enjoyable and profitable for you!

Download the “Goal-Based Networking” eBook Now >>

Stop Wasting Your Time at Networking Events! (Here’s Something that Actually Works)

By Jeff Beals

Most professionals know they must network in order to achieve long-term business success. I remember as far back as high school being told by my guidance counselor that I needed to “meet a lot of people and build a network.” That was great advice back then and even better advice today.

It’s critically important to participate in the public arena and interact with the people who could become your clients, provide you with valuable information or help you further your causes and beliefs.

Download your copy of the brand-new ebook, “Goal-Based Networking: Turning Your Socializing into Profitable Relationships!

While they understand the importance of networking, many professionals do a lousy job of it. It’s easy to show up at an event, grab a drink, eat some free hors d’oeuvres, say “hi” to a couple people, then go home and pat yourself on the back for being “involved outside the office.”

Unfortunately, that’s not networking. It’s merely socializing.

There’s nothing wrong with socializing. In fact, it’s generally a good thing, but it’s not efficient. In order to convert socializing into networking, you need to have a three-tiered goal planted in your mind before you even enter the venue where networking will take place.

I call it “goal-based networking,” and here’s how it works:

Goal #1

“I will get a direct opportunity”

This could be a new client, an invitation to join a prestigious organization, a job offer, a promise to donate money to your pet cause. While Goal #1 is ideal, it unfortunately doesn’t happen at most networking events.

Goal #2

“I will get a solid lead on a direct opportunity”

This is almost as good as the first goal, because it moves you closer to what you really want. Goal #2 should happen at the vast majority of networking events you attend. If it doesn’t, you’re not meeting enough people or not asking the right questions.

Goal #3

“I will meet new people and learn valuable information”

This is the bare-bones minimum goal that you should achieve at every single networking event you attend.

Make a commitment to network more and remember to think about these three goals before walking into your next networking event. Setting these goals consistently over a long period of time will maximize the return from your investments in networking. That means you increase your public profile, connect with the right people, find new business and become that person who always seems to know about business happenings long before your colleagues do.

Surprise ending: This article is actually Chapter Two of my brand-new ebook, “Goal-Based Networking: Turning Your Socializing into Profitable Relationships.”  The ebook is FREE, so download your copy now by clicking here:  https://jeffbeals.com/free-ebook2.php

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker, sales consultant and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

Click here to subscribe to Jeff’s weekly articles!

Here’s Why Should You Choose Jeff Beals as Your Next Speaker:

“Jeff is sure to deliver an engaging and motivating speech! He cleverly ties together his stories and makes the speech end with a punch. Being the closing speaker is tough, but he stepped-up to the challenge and hit a home-run. Due to the high ratings and overwhelming response to re-watch his speech, we are planning on using his video during our NextGen watch party.”  – Megan Dotson, Senior Client Success Consultant & Event Director, GovLoop, Washington, DC

“You brought great value to our event. The workshop was a huge experience for our attendees by giving them the opportunity to improve their work in the critical environment in which we are living today. Your talent as a speaker and your qualities as a person made the difference during your time with us. I would certainly recommend you to anyone who asks.” – Ana Paula Costa, Educational Planner, Febracorp, Sao Paulo, Brazil

“A couple of my Dean’s Fellows recently said your presentation two years ago about building your personal brand was their best experience at Creighton.” – Dr. Anthony R. Hendrickson, Dean, Heider College of Business, Creighton University 

“Our corporate partnership team had great takeaways regarding how to network smarter while also understanding the importance of our personal brand to current and prospective partners. Jeff does a great job weaving in real-world examples and how you can apply his teachings to growing your business and building long-term partnerships.”
– Jason Booker, Senior Director of Corporate Sponsorships, The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball Team

Click here to see sample videos of Jeff speaking to live audiences!

Goal-Based Networking: Turn Your Socializing into Profitable Relationships (New eBook Available)

By Jeff Beals

The American philosopher Henry David Thoreau once said, “I went to the woods, because I wanted to live deliberately. I wanted to love deep and suck out all the marrow of life.”

As professionals we need “to suck out the marrow” of our business lives. We must lead active, deliberate careers that are externally focused. That means you turn off the laptop, step out of your cubical and get involved outside the office.

As long as you don’t over-commit yourself – burning the candle at both ends, so to speak – being involved actually makes you better at your core work.

People who join professional associations, who get involved in their place of worship, or who engage in community service learn more and meet more prospective clients.

In any given office, there is at least one person who is active in the community or profession and seemingly knows everyone. It is no coincidence that such a person brings in a lot of business, finds great publicity opportunities for the organization and, in turn, earns job promotions.

Simply put, involvement leads to success. You must be out there seeing and being seen. You have to do it perpetually, so that your personal target audience knows about you and remembers you.

Use your time wisely. If you have family or other commitments in the evening, use your lunch hour for networking and personal branding activities. Ambitious professionals should not eat lunch by themselves more than once or twice a week; it’s simply too important of a networking opportunity to waste.

The fact is, in order to stand out, you need to be seemingly “everywhere.” As much as you may desire to go home and watch television after work, you need to spend a little more time working, showing up at events. While you don’t have to drink until your liver gives out, you do need to be a man or woman about town. Sometimes you have to stay out late at a cocktail party where important prospects have gathered. Sometimes you need to get up early and meet a member of your personal target audience for coffee before you both start work.

It’s not easy, and it comes with a price, but successful professionals are seemingly everywhere.

But being everywhere does not just mean showing up and socializing with people you already know. There’s a difference between socializing and networking, and this ebook is designed to explain that and show you how to turn your socializing into networking, which is far more valuable.

Just like anything else in life, you need to network deliberately with discipline and a defined purpose. If you do that, you will be much more effective.

Remember, if your commitment to networking is half-hearted, your results will be only half-baked!

NOTE: This article is actually the first chapter of my brand-new ebook, “Goal-Based Networking: Turning Your Socializing into Profitable Relationships.”  It’s free, so download your copy now by clicking here:  https://jeffbeals.com/free-ebook2.php

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker, sales consultant and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

Click here to subscribe to Jeff’s weekly articles!

Here’s Why Should You Choose Jeff Beals as Your Next Speaker:

“Jeff is sure to deliver an engaging and motivating speech! He cleverly ties together his stories and makes the speech end with a punch. Being the closing speaker is tough, but he stepped-up to the challenge and hit a home-run. Due to the high ratings and overwhelming response to re-watch his speech, we are planning on using his video during our NextGen watch party.”  – Megan Dotson, Senior Client Success Consultant & Event Director, GovLoop, Washington, DC

“You brought great value to our event. The workshop was a huge experience for our attendees by giving them the opportunity to improve their work in the critical environment in which we are living today. Your talent as a speaker and your qualities as a person made the difference during your time with us. I would certainly recommend you to anyone who asks.” – Ana Paula Costa, Educational Planner, Febracorp, Sao Paulo, Brazil

“A couple of my Dean’s Fellows recently said your presentation two years ago about building your personal brand was their best experience at Creighton.” – Dr. Anthony R. Hendrickson, Dean, Heider College of Business, Creighton University 

“Our corporate partnership team had great takeaways regarding how to network smarter while also understanding the importance of our personal brand to current and prospective partners. Jeff does a great job weaving in real-world examples and how you can apply his teachings to growing your business and building long-term partnerships.”
– Jason Booker, Senior Director of Corporate Sponsorships, The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball Team

Click here to see sample videos of Jeff speaking to live audiences!

It Pays to Think Like a Marketer When Promoting Your Personal Brand

By Jeff Beals

Because you are a business unto yourself with your own brand to promote, it is only logical that you should think like a marketer.

Personal brands are symbolic embodiments of an individual professional that publicly distinguish that person from all other competitors. A brand is a trademark, a distinctive name, and a combination of images that creates associations and expectations in the minds of audience members.

Marketers of products and services are obsessed with branding. Companies hire talented marketers to craft strategic plans for each of their brands and then carry out the communications tactics that are part of the plans.

Likewise, you need a plan for your own personal brand. Fortunately, your strategic self marketing plan can be much simpler than a typical corporate marketing plan. The purpose of a self marketing plan is to build name recognition and positive opinions about your personal brand so that members of your personal target audience think of you when they have some personal or business opportunity that you would like.

As an individual professional trying to make a difference in the world, you should be obsessed with your personal brand.

BASIC MARKETING PRINCIPLES

Some principles of marketing are worth considering. Among these are frequency, repetition, reach and prioritization.

Frequency and repetition matter a great deal. In order for the typical person to remember your name, he or she needs to hear it over and over again. What’s more, exposure to your name and reputation needs to occur consistently on a perpetual basis.  Furthermore, your message needs to reach the right people.

As consumers of information, we need to hear the same thing many times and in many instances in order for it to become fully rooted in our brains. That’s why you hear company names repeated so many times in commercials and why the same commercials are played over and over. It’s why successful companies continue to advertise even after they’ve been around for years and have established large customer bases.

Professionals who have a self marketing plan never let down. They keep showing up at events and scheduling meetings with people. They keep getting publicity and engaging in high-profile activities. If you fall out of the self marketing spotlight for just a short time, your star fades rapidly.

Prioritization means that you spend the majority of your self marketing time focusing on that part of your personal target audience that has the highest likelihood of benefiting you. Opportunity sometimes comes from the least likely sources, but you should spend more resources on the people who can help you most.

HOW MUCH EXAGGERATION IS OKAY?

While deceptive self marketing is bad, it is generally okay to use a little bit of puffery and some euphemisms in your communications. Puffery is a slight exaggeration of fact done in such a way that nobody considers it lying. For example, you might call yourself, “the friendliest insurance agent in the state.” Well, no matter how nice you are, that’s probably not true. Anyone who thinks about it can figure out that it’s just puffery. Calling yourself a “guru” could be an acceptable euphemism assuming you are an expert in your field.

IN CONCLUSION

Self marketing must be a perpetual activity, and you can never let down your intensity. Even when everything in your career and personal life is going great, you need to market yourself in order to be in position for future opportunities.

Responsible people save money to prepare for an unforeseen financial crisis or to be able to invest in a business opportunity that may come their way. Similarly, savvy professionals market themselves to prepare for a rainy day or to take full advantage of a perfect day.

Jeff Beals is a professional speaker, sales consultant and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.

Click here to subscribe to Jeff’s weekly articles!

Here’s Why Should You Choose Jeff Beals as Your Next Speaker:

“Jeff is sure to deliver an engaging and motivating speech! He cleverly ties together his stories and makes the speech end with a punch. Being the closing speaker is tough, but he stepped-up to the challenge and hit a home-run. Due to the high ratings and overwhelming response to re-watch his speech, we are planning on using his video during our NextGen watch party.”  – Megan Dotson, Senior Client Success Consultant & Event Director, GovLoop, Washington, DC

“A couple of my Dean’s Fellows recently said your presentation two years ago about building your personal brand was their best experience at Creighton.” – Dr. Anthony R. Hendrickson, Dean, Heider College of Business, Creighton University 

“Our corporate partnership team had great takeaways regarding how to network smarter while also understanding the importance of our personal brand to current and prospective partners. Jeff does a great job weaving in real-world examples and how you can apply his teachings to growing your business and
building long-term partnerships.”
– Jason Booker, Senior Director of Corporate Sponsorships, The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball Team

Click here to see sample videos of Jeff speaking to live audiences!

Learn How Personal Branding Can Improve Your Sales & Marketing Abilities!Download this Complimentary eBook Today: “Self Marketing Power 101″ >>

Embracing Your Personal Target Audience

By Jeff Beals
Seven billion is an overwhelmingly large number.
That’s the approximate number of people now living on planet Earth. The thought of selling a product or service to all seven billion is a staggering thought, but fortunately, marketers focus on niches, narrow slices of the population. The trick is to identify the appropriate slice.
The same thing applies when marketing yourself, for you are a product. You are a brand. You are a business unto yourself.
In order to promote yourself effectively, you need to become a celebrity in your own “sphere of interest.” Every professional has a sphere of interest. It’s your own narrow slice of the population. You could also call it a “personal target audience.” It’s comprised of those people, who in any way, can help you reach your goals – clients, prospective clients, those who refer clients, someone who could hire you, someone who could get you on a coveted committee or board.
Among these people, you need to be famous. When someone in your personal target audience needs the services or products you provide, your name and face should pop into their minds. When someone is looking for people to invite to a special occasion, your name needs to be at the top of the list. You are a highly desired person in your community or industry when a large number of people in your personal target audience have heard of you and have a positive feeling associated with you.
But before you can become a celebrity, you need to determine who is in your personal target audience. This is determined by your business, career, life mission, goals and personality.
Once you know who is in your personal target audience, manage it carefully. Just like a company managing its prospective clients, you as an individual must diligently manage your personal target audience and lavish attention upon it. The people in your personal target audience are precious, critical to your success.
If you tend to your personal target audience, it will yield positive results and help you achieve greater personal and professional success.
Now that we have established this, it’s time to think about your personal target audience. What types of people need to know about you? Where are they? How do you reach them?
There may be billions of people in today’s loud and crowded marketplace, but it’s liberating to know that you can become famous enough by chasing only a minuscule percentage of them. In order to get your message to connect with the right niche, think about what you do and who is in your personal target audience.
Jeff Beals is a professional speaker and award-winning author, who helps professionals enjoy greater success through effective sales, marketing and personal branding techniques. He delivers energetic and humorous keynote speeches and workshops to audiences worldwide. To discuss booking a presentation, go to JeffBeals.com or email at info@jeffbeals.com or call us at (402) 637-9300.