Tag Archives: sales cycle

How to Steal Your Competitor’s Clients

By Jeff Beals

Most people don’t know this, but from 2003 to 2009, I taught a commercial real estate sales-and-leasing course at my local university as an adjunct professor.  It was an upper-level course offered in the spring semester, so I typically had a lot of graduating seniors in my class.

One of my students passed her real estate licensure exam upon graduating and affiliated with a large residential brokerage company. She came from a prominent family, was active in the community and had a large network of friends. She was dismayed on two separate occasions when a family member and good friend chose NOT to use her as their real estate agent.

You see, those people had bought and sold houses before and chose to keep their former real estate agents.

Why? The agents had done a great job for them and had built relationships that were too strong for the unproven newbie to break. My former student was persistent, however. She kept prospecting and promoted her services to thousands of people. A year later, she had built plenty of professional relationships and was doing big deals.

I share this story with you to demonstrate that long-standing relationships are difficult to break. That’s why those relationships are so valuable. It’s hard to crack the bond your competitors have with their existing clients no matter how awesome your company is and how talented you are as a sales professional.

But it’s not impossible.

Here are some things you might consider if you’re trying to wiggle in between a client and your competitor:

Just One Thing

Some sales professionals have success by building a relationship with a prospective client and then asking for just a small piece of business.  You can say something like this: “I know you have a strong relationship with XYZ Company, and I respect that. They certainly do a good job.  But I know I can provide value too.  What if you gave me just one account, just one small piece of business, so I can prove myself to you?  At the same time, you spread your risk by having more than one company working on your account.”

Send a Gift

One way to get the attention of a competitor’s client is to send a strategic gift.  I like to find the newest business book on the market especially one that relates to the prospect’s business or interests.  Send a note explaining why you think the book is relevant to that person.  It sometimes helps to shrink-wrap your note and the book together, so it seems like a big deal to the recipient.  You can then call the recipient a couple days after they receive the gift.  You’ll find the recipient likely will be more interested in talking to you because you sent an impactful gift.

Read the Reviews

In some industries, clients write reviews about companies online.  Study the reviews written about your competitor.  If you see a number of negative reviews that form a pattern, you might be on to a vulnerability you can exploit to get between them and their current clients. One disclaimer to keep in mind – if a client blasts your competitor online, it could mean the client is the problem and not your competitor.  That could come back to bite your company if you take on that client.

Be Persistent

Perhaps the most important piece of advice is to be in the fight for the long haul.  If you walk away immediately upon hearing that a prospective client already has a relationship with one of your competitors, you’re giving up too quickly.  Perhaps you could start a nurturing campaign in which you send compelling, value-laden emails to the prospect thus building a relationship slowly over time.  You could periodically send them valuable bits of information or advice that show you are both thinking about them and coming up with unsolicited value.  That will make you look good vis-à-vis their current provider who is likely taking the client for granted and no longer going above and beyond the call of duty.

Plant High Hurdles

Determine one or more things that you do better than any of your competitors.  Then, when you’re trying to steal away one of your competitor’s clients, set a high hurdle.  In your conversations with that client, say something like this: “Whoever provides you with this service should always do ‘X.’”  Of course, “X” is the thing you do well that you know the other company can not do.

But Don’t Do This:

There are a number of techniques you can try, but there’s one technique I don’t recommend: discounting your price.  That’s the easy way out, and it’s a short-term way of thinking.  Some sellers think they’ll win over a new client by giving them a drastic discount.  It might work, but know this – once you give a discount, the client might always expect that price.  Plus, if you discount too much, you may end up losing money.  Finally, a willingness to discount may make your project appear to be of diminished value.  If you want a good client for a long period of time, you need to earn them the old-fashioned way (by providing value) as opposed to the easy-but-temporary way (discounting).

Jeff Beals shows you how to find better prospects, close more deals and capture greater market share.  Jeff is an international award-winning author, sought-after keynote speaker, and accomplished sales consultant. A frequent media guest, Jeff has been featured in Investor’s Business Daily, USA Today, Men’s Health, Chicago Tribune and The New York Times.”

Here’s Why Should You Choose Jeff Beals as Your Next Speaker:

“Jeff Beals has presented four different topics at five of our internal events in this year. At each event, the audience of commercial real estate principals and agents was completely engaged and motivated the entire time. Jeff facilitates his training sessions in such a way that each member of the audience was able to relate and understand how to apply it every day in the field. Jeff is brilliant, and we have hired him to continue speaking at our events next year!” – Lindsay Fierro, Senior Vice President, NAI Global, New York, NY

“Your workshop was a huge experience for our attendees by giving them the opportunity to improve their work in the critical environment in which we are living today. Your talent as a speaker and your qualities as a person made the difference during your time with us. I would certainly recommend you to anyone who asks.” – Ana Paula Costa, Educational Planner, Febracorp, Sao Paulo, Brazil

I’m in Phoenix and had breakfast earlier this morning with our semi-retired sales representative who is doing some continued work for us here.  He attended your sales meeting last week and told me that in 43 years of selling, you were the best he had ever heard.  Thanks for a great experience.” – Drew Vogel, President & CEO, Diamond Vogel Paints, Orange City, IA

“Our corporate partnership team had great takeaways regarding how to network smarter while also understanding the importance of our personal brand to current and prospective partners. Jeff does a great job weaving in real-world examples and how you can apply his teachings to growing your business and building long-term partnerships.” – Jason Booker, Senior Director of Corporate Sponsorships, The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball Team

+1-402-637-9300

info@jeffbeals.com

How Sales Professionals Can Harness the Power of Persuasion

By Jeff Beals

Some people are blessed with a natural ability to get what they want.

They have an innate ability to influence people, sway opinions and win arguments.  While such “mind powers” are instinctive to some, most of us have to work hard to persuade people to our way of thinking.  Fortunately, persuasion and influence cannot only be learned; they can be mastered.

Have you ever read Robert Cialdini?  He’s the “Godfather of Influence” and the author of Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion, one of the most influential business books of the past 30 years.  More recently, he authored Pre-Suasion: A Revolutionary Way to Influence and Persuade.

Much of Cialdini’s work is focused on helping people master “leadership’s greatest challenge – getting things done through others.”  But the skills employed by accomplished leaders are quite similar to those needed in sales.  Let’s look at Cialdini’s Six Principles of Influence through a sales lens:

Liking

The principle of liking says that people like those who are like them.  You should “uncover real similarities and offer genuine praise.”

Cialdini uses the example of a Tupperware party to illustrate how liking works. The hostess invites friends and family members. Because the attendees like the hostess, they’re far more willing to buy Tupperware products.  For example, my wife finds herself at a handful of parties each year for multi-level marketing products such as Tuppperware.  Inevitably, she ends up buying something just to please her friend (the hostess).

The two most significant factors affecting liking are similarity and praise. People are more apt to like people who are similar to them.  If you praise other people – even if that praise isn’t terribly merited – they are much more likely to like you.

What does that tell us?

Sales managers should sales representatives who have similar interests and backgrounds as the targeted prospects. Sales reps should take time after meeting new prospects to establish common ground.  Find excuses to compliment your prospects on their companies, products, careers and accomplishments.

Reciprocity

According to the principle of reciprocity, people have a tendency to repay in kind.

Do unto others as you would have them do unto you – The Golden Rule has been scientifically proven to be true.  Cialdini says any manager can be the beneficiary of good behavior by displaying the same behavior to others first.

The same applies to sales professionals.

Gift giving is a somewhat primitive example of reciprocity, but I have had success reaching prospects by first sending them a little gift.  Simply because I mailed them a copy of my books or a unique gift that relates to their company, I am much more likely to reach them on the phone.

Social Proof

This is my favorite of Cialdini’s principles because it relates directly to sales: “People follow the lead of similar others.”  We should “use peer power whenever it’s available.”

Cialdini cites a study in which researchers went door-to-door collecting donations for a charity.  When people answered the door, the researchers showed them a list of neighborhood residents who had already donated to the charity. The longer the donor list, the more likely prospective donors were to contribute.

Social proof is why references, testimonials and referrals are so important in sales.  Take time to collect testimonials and make them available to prospective clients.  Get a referral from a respected source before making a prospecting call.  Your success rate should rise dramatically.

Consistency

“People align with their clear commitments,” Cialdini says. “Make their commitments active, public and voluntary.”

Cialdini says if you supervise an employee who should submit reports on time, get that understanding in writing (such as a memo or email); make the commitment public (perhaps by sharing it with people in other affected departments); and link the commitment to the employee’s values (such as the impact of timely reports on team spirit).

This is why winning mini commitments is so effective in selling. If your prospective client agrees to something up front, you are more likely to close a sale with them. Perhaps you could summarize the outcome of a meeting in an email and ask the prospect to email you back confirming that everything you said is accurate.

Authority

The principle of authority says that “people defer to experts,” and Cialdini advises you to “expose your expertise; don’t assume it’s self-evident.”

While it is critically important for sales people to listen more than they talk when sitting in front of prospective clients, you do need to take at least a little bit of time to demonstrate your credentials and backgrounds.

Scarcity

People naturally want more of what they can have less of, Cialdini says, so highlight unique benefits and exclusive information.”

Cialdini writes about a time when wholesale beef buyers’ orders jumped 600 percent when they alone received information on a possible beef shortage.  Provide exclusive information to persuade.  When you tell people they are getting information before everyone else, they are more interested.  If people know they have access to something that is closed to others, they value it more.

Sales professionals might want to make special offers or upgrades available to the best clients first, or in some cases, only to the best clients.

In the end, sales professionals can gain a clear advantage by employing  Cialdini’s six principles, but keep a few things in mind – Trust is one of the most important components to completing a sale especially a complex, high-ticket-price B2B transaction. If you use these principles with an exploitative and manipulative heart, you will hurt your chances of creating a recurring client.

The other key to selling is value. You must discover exactly what prospective clients value and then deliver products and services which deliver that value exactly. If you fail to do that, the principles of influence will ultimately be ineffective.

Jeff Beals shows you how to find better prospects, close more deals and capture greater market share.  Jeff is an international award-winning author, sought-after keynote speaker, and accomplished sales consultant. A frequent media guest, Jeff has been featured in Investor’s Business Daily, USA Today, Men’s Health, Chicago Tribune and The New York Times.”

Here’s Why Should You Choose Jeff Beals as Your Next Speaker:

“Jeff Beals has presented four different topics at five of our internal events in 2016. At each event, the audience of commercial real estate principals and agents was completely engaged and motivated the entire time. Jeff facilitates his training sessions in such a way that each member of the audience was able to relate and understand how to apply it every day in the field. Jeff is brilliant, and we have hired him to continue speaking at our events in 2017!” – Lindsay Fierro, Senior Vice President, NAI Global, New York, NY

“Your workshop was a huge experience for our attendees by giving them the opportunity to improve their work in the critical environment in which we are living today. Your talent as a speaker and your qualities as a person made the difference during your time with us. I would certainly recommend you to anyone who asks.” – Ana Paula Costa, Educational Planner, Febracorp, Sao Paulo, Brazil

I’m in Phoenix and had breakfast earlier this morning with our semi-retired sales representative who is doing some continued work for us here.  He attended your sales meeting last week and told me that in 43 years of selling, you were the best he had ever heard.  Thanks for a great experience.” – Drew Vogel, President & CEO, Diamond Vogel Paints, Orange City, IA

“Our corporate partnership team had great takeaways regarding how to network smarter while also understanding the importance of our personal brand to current and prospective partners. Jeff does a great job weaving in real-world examples and how you can apply his teachings to growing your business and building long-term partnerships.” – Jason Booker, Senior Director of Corporate Sponsorships, The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball Team

+1-402-917-5730

info@jeffbeals.com

The Only Sales Knowledge You’ll Ever Need

anthony-iannarino-book

By Jeff Beals

In his new book on selling, Anthony Iannarino asks readers to finish this sentence: “I sell ___.”

He then writes, “If you answered anything other than ‘outcomes,’ you are wrong. If you answered with your product, service or solution, your answer is so off the mark that it might destroy your ability to succeed in sales.”

Iannarino then goes on to quote the late economist Theodore Levitt, who said, “People don’t want to buy a quarter-inch drill. They want to buy a quarter-inch hole.” In other words, customers are purchasing desired outcomes even if they are technically purchasing the means of creating outcomes.  Those sellers who realize what they are truly selling have a tremendous advantage over the great mass of ordinary sellers who are obsessed with products and services, features and benefits.

Among 19 meaty chapters of non-stop sales wisdom, the above quotes illustrate perfectly just how much value you’ll find in Iannarino’s The Only Sales Guide You’ll Ever Need (Portfolio Penguin, 2016) which was just released a couple months ago.

Iannarino is an internationally acclaimed sales consultant and trainer as well as creator of one of the world’s most popular sales blogs.  In writing the book, he set out to explain why a small number of salespeople in any field are hugely successful, while the remaining common sales folk are mediocre or worse.

Some call it the “80-20” rule (and in some industries, it’s more like the “90-10” rule), but it’s essentially true – Twenty percent of sales people account for 80 percent of the business.  Everyone else is fighting over the scraps.  I certainly don’t want to dwell among the unexceptional 80 percent and hopefully you don’t either.

So, why the discrepancy among the haves and have-nots in the sales profession?  Iannarino’s answer is simple and straight forward – It’s all about the seller.  If you are in sales, you and you alone are responsible for your success and failure. In other words, you can decide to be a successful sales professional, and that decision is independent of product, service or industry.

Sales success, according to Iannarino, is not situational nor is about the market. It’s about the individual sales professional.  That leads us to a burning question: How do you make sure you’re part of the distinguished 20 percent?

The answer is divided into two parts which correspond to the two primary sections of Iannarino’s book: 1. your mindset, which includes beliefs and behaviors; 2. your skill sets.

The mindsets include self-discipline, positive attitude, competitiveness, resourcefulness, persistence and a few others. Once you thoroughly understand and adopt these mindsets, Iannarino says you can then start mastering the mechanics of selling.  Here are thoughts on just a few of his skill sets:

Closing Deals

Iannarino argues that selling effectively is all about gaining commitments.  You need to be an ethical and consultative seller while assertively asking for commitments. There are numerous mini closes in the buying process such as the commitments to devote time, to explore, to change, to build consensus, and to invest resources.  Each time you get a small commitment, you move the buyer closer to the finish line.

Prospecting

Never wait until you need to prospect as it should be something you do perpetually whether times are tough or you have so much business you can hardly keep your breath.  Regarding the art of prospecting, Iannarino says, “You can’t cram prospecting. It must be a daily discipline. Block out time every day.”  He also says, “Prospecting is a campaign, not an event. It’s a series of touches that lead to a conversation and an opportunity to meet.”

Business Acumen

In the olden days of selling, sales people got by as long as they had extensive product knowledge.  That’s becoming less important now, because so much information and so many reviews of products are available online. Innarino says today’s “dream clients” want salespeople who will partner with them and guide them to a better future.  Clients want trusted advisers.  In order to provide that kind of high-level value, you need business acumen.

How do you get business acumen?

Constantly read and study business, get mentors, play close attention to what clients say. Ultimately, you must know much more than what you sell. While this in some ways seems obvious, Iannarino says that business acumen is still rare in sales. Don’t worry so much about product knowledge that you don’t know enough big-picture stuff to help your clients truly improve their R.O.I.

In the end, successful salespeople stay ahead of their competitors in a dynamic selling environment.  Because of globalization and many other factors, Iannarino believes that selling is more difficult today than it was in the past. That’s despite all the technological advances that have made a salesperson’s just easier in other ways.

To become an elite sales professional, I highly recommend The Only Sales Guide You’ll Ever Need.

I have had the chance to talk with Iannarino on a couple occasions. His brain is packed with sales knowledge and experience. The sales world is fortunate that he finally decided to put that knowledge in a tidy, organized book that delivers amazing value.

Jeff Beals shows you how to find better prospects, close more deals and capture greater market share.  Jeff is an international award-winning author, sought-after keynote speaker, and accomplished sales consultant. A frequent media guest, Jeff has been featured in Investor’s Business Daily, USA Today, Men’s Health, Chicago Tribune and The New York Times.”

Here’s Why Should You Choose Jeff Beals as Your Next Speaker:

“Jeff Beals has presented four different topics at five of our internal events in 2016. At each event, the audience of commercial real estate principals and agents was completely engaged and motivated the entire time. Jeff facilitates his training sessions in such a way that each member of the audience was able to relate and understand how to apply it every day in the field. Jeff is brilliant, and we have hired him to continue speaking at our events in 2017!” – Lindsay Fierro, Senior Vice President, NAI Global, New York, NY

“Your workshop was a huge experience for our attendees by giving them the opportunity to improve their work in the critical environment in which we are living today. Your talent as a speaker and your qualities as a person made the difference during your time with us. I would certainly recommend you to anyone who asks.” – Ana Paula Costa, Educational Planner, Febracorp, Sao Paulo, Brazil

I’m in Phoenix and had breakfast earlier this morning with our semi-retired sales representative who is doing some continued work for us here.  He attended your sales meeting last week and told me that in 43 years of selling, you were the best he had ever heard.  Thanks for a great experience.” – Drew Vogel, President & CEO, Diamond Vogel Paints, Orange City, IA

“Our corporate partnership team had great takeaways regarding how to network smarter while also understanding the importance of our personal brand to current and prospective partners. Jeff does a great job weaving in real-world examples and how you can apply his teachings to growing your business and building long-term partnerships.” – Jason Booker, Senior Director of Corporate Sponsorships, The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball Team

+1-402-917-5730

info@jeffbeals.com

How to Get Glowing Testimonials from Your Current Clients

By Jeff Beals

Allow me to lift the curtain and give you a behind-the-scenes look at the world of book writing.

You know those endorsements by celebrities, other authors and industry experts that appear at the beginning of a book and on the back cover?  They are rarely written by the actual endorser. Instead, they are often written by the authors themselves or someone who works at a publishing company.

Here’s how it works:

You write a book. You feel good about it.  You understand that readers will be more apt to buy your book if respected people have endorsed it.  You make a list of industry experts and other authors who have written similar books.  You contact those respected people and ask them to write an endorsement or testimonial for your book.  If those potential endorsers know you or have heard of you, they’ll likely say “yes.”

But there’s a problem.  The endorsers are busy, which leads to a couple of scenarios: 1. They intend to read the book and write an endorsement but they never get around to it; or 2. They ask you to draft the endorsement language and send it to them for their approval.

Scenario #2 is quite common, so authors write up a proposed endorsement and email it to the big-named endorser.  If that person is comfortable with the wording, he or she will approve it, and presto! the book has an impressive endorsement.

The same thing happens every day in your industry.

As a sales professional, you need testimonials from past and current clients attesting to your outstanding service and product value.

A long list of client testimonials makes it easier to get new business. In an era of social media reviews, clients expect would-be vendors to have proof that they provide great service and high-quality products. One of the ways you show that is by providing glowing testimonials from highly satisfied clients.  Strong testimonials make you a safe choice.

But be prepared; you might have to do much of the work yourself. Just like the book-promotion world, your happy clients would love to write a testimonial for you, but they’re stressed out and short on time.

What makes a good testimonial?

  1. Make it specific to you, your product and your company.
  1. It should be obvious who the testimonial writer is and why he or she is relevant to your business.
  1. The testimonial clearly states what problem you solved and what unique value you brought. It should show that you deliver on promises, go above and beyond and get results for your clients!
  1. It should not be fluffy or overly wordy.
  1. Testimonials are particularly powerful when they show how you made someone money, made someone look good in front of other people, made someone’s life easier or reduced someone’s stress.
  1. If you have ever helped a client overcome adversity, include that in the testimonial.
  1. Testimonials should put the reader in the testimonial writer’s shoes. Readers should imagine themselves benefiting from your products and services just like the testimonial writer did.
  1. Make it positive but not obnoxiously gushing.

How do you get testimonials?

  1. Be prepared to write it yourself and ask if they would be willing to attach their name to it. Don’t offer this right away, because some people take pride in writing their own testimonials.
  1. If they do want to write it themselves, stand ready to coach and guide them. Let them know what purpose the testimonial has in your sales efforts and what messages would be particularly effective for you.
  1. Plant a seed and make it easy. Remind them of how you served them. It’s okay to ask them to highlight certain things.
  1. Think of interesting stories you have experienced with the client and suggest they highlight one of those stories as part of the testimonial.
  1. Ask existing or past clients a few questions about your products and services. If the answers are positive, you could say, “You know, it would be so helpful if my prospective customers could hear what you said. Would you consider writing a short testimonial for me that I could use in my future sales efforts?”
  1. Send clients a written survey. Some of the responses could be fodder for a strong testimonial. Of course, get their permission before you publicly quote them.
  1. Don’t be bashful! If you are confident you made the client happy, ask them to be bold and positive.
  1. Give in order to receive. Write an unsolicited testimonial for your client and then ask them to do the same for you.

In many cases, one competitor beats another because he or she has better testimonials.  I have personally witnessed it.

Gather those testimonials!

Make sure they are well written and clearly show how you provide differentiated value. Then, put them into your prospects hands.  Publish them on your website and social media platforms and hand them out as leave-behinds during sales presentations.

Clients want social proof.  Powerful testimonials get the job done.

Jeff Beals shows you how to find better prospects, close more deals and capture greater market share.  Jeff is an international award-winning author, sought-after keynote speaker, and accomplished sales consultant. A frequent media guest, Jeff has been featured in Investor’s Business Daily, USA Today, Men’s Health, Chicago Tribune and The New York Times.”

Here’s Why Should You Choose Jeff Beals as Your Next Speaker:

“Jeff is sure to deliver an engaging and motivating speech! He cleverly ties together his stories and makes the speech end with a punch. Being the closing speaker is tough, but he stepped-up to the challenge and hit a home-run. Due to the high ratings and overwhelming response to re-watch his speech, we are planning on using his video during our NextGen watch party.”  – Megan Dotson, Senior Client Success Consultant & Event Director, GovLoop.com, Washington, DC

“Your workshop was a huge experience for our attendees by giving them the opportunity to improve their work in the critical environment in which we are living today. Your talent as a speaker and your qualities as a person made the difference during your time with us. I would certainly recommend you to anyone who asks.” – Ana Paula Costa, Educational Planner, Febracorp, Sao Paulo, Brazil

“Our corporate partnership team had great takeaways regarding how to network smarter while also understanding the importance of our personal brand to current and prospective partners. Jeff does a great job weaving in real-world examples and how you can apply his teachings to growing your business and
building long-term partnerships.” – Jason Booker, Senior Director of Corporate Sponsorships, The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball Team

“If you are considering hiring Jeff, I will only say this: do it now. His ability to connect with an audience and explain the importance of telling the story is nothing short of extraordinary. The true litmus of any great speaker is authenticity. And when authenticity is coupled with an incredibly high amount of energy, humor, and engagement – you get Jeff.  I would highly recommend him to anyone who needs a speaker attendees will talk about for a long time to come.” – Alison Cody, Executive Director, Manufacturers’ Agents Association for the Foodservice Industry, Atlanta, GA

“I’m in Phoenix and had breakfast earlier this morning with our semi-retired sales representative who is doing some continued work for us here.  He attended your sales meeting last week and told me that in 43 years of selling, you were the best he had ever heard.  Thanks for a great experience.” – Drew Vogel, President & CEO, Diamond Vogel Paints, Orange City, IA

+1-402-917-5730

info@jeffbeals.com

5 Ways to Develop Trust with Your Clients

By Jeff Beals

Here are a couple indisputable truths about today’s business environment:

  • Sales cycles are much faster than they were 10 years ago.
  • Buyers are distracted and under much more pressure than they were in earlier times.

Because we now operate in a frenzied selling environment, some sales professionals believe there is no longer a need to develop trust. They argue that there’s not enough time to build trusting relationships, and even when you do have time, many buyers prefer to keep their vendors at arm’s length.

I personally don’t agree.

I acknowledge that sales professionals must try harder to build trust, but the end result is well worth the effort.  The good news is that you don’t have to go from not knowing someone to lifelong confidant in one setting.  Build trust a little bit at a time.  When you first meet a prospective client, get to know them, build rapport and establish a relationship.  As you get serious about doing business together, there are five ways you can develop trust.  Keep doing these things over time, and you’ll develop a close friendship with a person who will become one of your all-time best clients:

  1. Communication

Those sales professionals who go out of their way to communicate tend to build trust quicker and more deeply with clients. Detailed and timely communication removes suspicions and reassures clients.  Tell the truth and don’t procrastinate when you need to tell prospects things they don’t want to hear.  As former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell once said, “Bad news isn’t wine. It doesn’t improve with age.”

Another important part of communication is to say you are sorry when appropriate. It’s amazing how much an earnest and sincere apology can boost trust.

  1. Moment of Truth

At some point in any given relationship, you will encounter a moment of truth, a time in which you will be faced with an important decision. How you decide to act determines if you “pass” the moment of truth.  If you do pass it, you build trust.  Fail it and the relationship could be irreparably damaged.

What are some moment-of-truth examples? When it’s tempting to lie but you tell the truth.  When you have a choice to do something in your interest or your client’s interest and you choose the client’s. When you go the extra mile to help clients achieve their goals. When you screw up and do everything in your power to fix the situation.

Moments of truth are opportunities.  Embrace them as a chance to prove your trustworthiness and advance the relationship.  Every time you pass a moment of truth, no matter how small, trust becomes at least a little deeper.

 3. Consistent Performance

People trust other people whose behavior is predictable. If you are the type of person who responds to challenges in a consistently professional manner, you come across as trustworthy.

The best predictor of a person’s future actions is frequent past behavior. If you consistently establish frequent past behavior that is trustworthy, it will be much easier for you to be trusted in the future.

  1. Behave Like a Fiduciary

In addition to my speaking and sales consulting practice, I work in commercial real estate. I’ve held a real estate license for the past 16 years.  As a licensee, I legally have a fiduciary relationship with my clients. That means I am required to put their interests before mine. Even if you work in a profession that requires no licensure, pretend you have a fiduciary relationship with your clients and behave accordingly.  Practice this habit over a period of time and your clients will adore you.

  1. Be Absolutely Responsive

Andy Paul, author of Zero-Time Selling: 10 Essential Steps To Accelerate Every Company’s Sales, argues that the race does not go to the swift; it goes to the responsive. In a marketplace in which buyers complete much of the sales cycle on their own before they even contact a salesperson, you can’t be relatively responsive. You need to be absolutely responsive!

Paul says you follow up with 100 percent of leads immediately, practice unconditional support, make sure you have someone with deep product knowledge readily available in a client-facing position and record all facts in your CRM system immediately while the information is fresh.

No longer is it okay for salespeople to return messages within 24 hours.  That’s simply not fast enough.

In closing, those who flourish in sales for many years endure because they put a premium on people. They build trusting relationships not just for financial gain but because it’s also the right thing to do.

Elite sales professionals are in business for their clients. Ordinary ones are in business for themselves.

Jeff Beals shows you how to find better prospects, close more deals and capture greater market share.  Jeff is an international award-winning author, sought-after keynote speaker, and accomplished sales consultant. A frequent media guest, Jeff has been featured in Investor’s Business Daily, USA Today, Men’s Health, Chicago Tribune and The New York Times.”

Here’s Why Should You Choose Jeff Beals as Your Next Speaker:

“Jeff is sure to deliver an engaging and motivating speech! He cleverly ties together his stories and makes the speech end with a punch. Being the closing speaker is tough, but he stepped-up to the challenge and hit a home-run. Due to the high ratings and overwhelming response to re-watch his speech, we are planning on using his video during our NextGen watch party.”  – Megan Dotson, Senior Client Success Consultant & Event Director, GovLoop.com, Washington, DC

“Your workshop was a huge experience for our attendees by giving them the opportunity to improve their work in the critical environment in which we are living today. Your talent as a speaker and your qualities as a person made the difference during your time with us. I would certainly recommend you to anyone who asks.” – Ana Paula Costa, Educational Planner, Febracorp, Sao Paulo, Brazil

“Our corporate partnership team had great takeaways regarding how to network smarter while also understanding the importance of our personal brand to current and prospective partners. Jeff does a great job weaving in real-world examples and how you can apply his teachings to growing your business and
building long-term partnerships.” – Jason Booker, Senior Director of Corporate Sponsorships, The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball Team

“If you are considering hiring Jeff, I will only say this: do it now. His ability to connect with an audience and explain the importance of telling the story is nothing short of extraordinary. The true litmus of any great speaker is authenticity. And when authenticity is coupled with an incredibly high amount of energy, humor, and engagement – you get Jeff.  I would highly recommend him to anyone who needs a speaker attendees will talk about for a long time to come.” – Alison Cody, Executive Director, Manufacturers’ Agents Association for the Foodservice Industry, Atlanta, GA

“I’m in Phoenix and had breakfast earlier this morning with our semi-retired sales representative who is doing some continued work for us down here.  He attended your sales meeting last week and told me that in 43 years of selling, you were the best he had heard.  Thanks for a great experience.” – Drew Vogel, President & CEO, Diamond Vogel Paints, Orange City, IA

+1-402-917-5730

info@jeffbeals.com